Rice University

Department of English

  • Graduate Courses

  • Spring 2017 Graduate Courses

    ENGL 510 Pedagogy Seminar
    Waligora-Davis

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    510Tuesdays2:30-5L20TBD Waligora-Davis

    ENGL 510 - PEDAGOGY SEMINAR

    Long Title: PEDAGOGY SEMINAR
    Department: English
    Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
    Course Type: Seminar
    Credit Hours: 3
    Restrictions:
    Must be enrolled in one of the following Level(s):
    Graduate

    Description: For third-year graduate students preparing to teach their own classes in the fourth year. This Spring semester course will help students put together syllabi and other teaching materials, address various pedagogical issues and problems, formulate their teaching philosophies. Repeatable for Credit. 

    ENGL 537 19th Cent. Studies: Victorian Nonhumans
    Morton, Tim

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    537Mondays2-4:50HRG 224 Morton, Tim

    Spring 2017
    ENGL 537: Victorian Nonhumans
    Instructor: Tim Morton

    We can think the long nineteenth century as a sustained encounter between humans and a whole host of nonhuman beings. In fact, it's possible to think the major philosophical and scientific developments of that period precisely as a series of encounters with the nonhuman. This is the case for Marx, who discovered an economic substructure operating in spite of human intentionality; for Darwin, discoverer of evolution and thus the latest and greatest (for Derrida) “humiliator” of the human; for Freud, discoverer of the unconscious, the Id; for Nietzsche, whose Zarathustra sees man as existing somewhere between a plant and a ghost; even for Schopenhauer, whose horrifying Will machinates behind the scenes of the given, phenomenal world.

    The gigantic exertions of industry and technology, the whirlwind of capital, and the war machinery of imperialism churned up Earth as never before, depositing a thin layer of carbon in Earth's crust in what is now considered to be the beginning of an entirely new geological era, the Anthropocene. Ironically, however, this was a historical moment at which humans in some sense achieved a hermetically sealed world, in which everything is seen as it correlates to the human (Meillassoux). Understanding this period is key to understanding the DNA of our contemporary ecological situation, in which the fact of the Anthropocene has now dawned on us.

    In this class we shall investigate a whole host of nonhumans, from dinosaur fossils to stone statues of Buddhas, from geological eons to Christmas decorations. A number of art movements, from Romanticism to the Pre-Raphaelites to aestheticism, but also the novel, were concerned to trace nonhuman things, objects, and the thing-like qualities of humans. Only consider the vast array of things displayed at The Great Exhibition.

    Requirements:

    One short essay (12–15 pages), three short position papers (1500 words each), one presentation (10–15 minutes).

    Selected Reading:

    Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights 

    Charles Darwin, The Origin of Species 

    Charles Dickens, Bleak House 

    Sigmund Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams 

    Karl Marx, Capital I 

    Friedrich Nietzsche, The Birth of Tragedy 

    Arthur Schopenhauer, The World as Will and Representation 

    Mary Shelley, Frankenstein 

    Bram Stoker, Dracula 

    Alfred Lord Tennyson, In Memoriam 

    H.G. Wells, The War of the Worlds 

    Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray 

    ENGL 560 19th Cent. American Literature
    Levander, Caroline

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    560Wednesdays2-4:50HRG 224 Levander, Caroline

    ENGL 594 Topics In Modern/Contemp. Literature: Mid 20th Century
    Roof, Judith

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    594Thursdays2:30-5:20HRG 224 Roof, Judith

    Spring 2017  

    ENGL 594 Topics in Modern/Contemporary Literature  

    Instructor: Dr. Judith Roof  

    Thursdays 2:30-5:20 HRG 224  

    Literature of the Mid-Twentieth Century  

    Oft-ignored, the 20 years (or so) after the second world war produced both literatures and theory upon which we still rely. Caught between the anxiety-allaying exigencies of categories such as “Modernism” and Post-modernism,” much of this literature is neither, going altogether different aesthetic directions. This period hosts the flourishing of structuralism, Lacanian psychoanalysis, the work of Georges Bataille, Simone de Beauvoir, Roland Barthes, J. L. Austin, and the early theories of Jacques Derrida. Its literature includes not only the texts from he “Beats” and “The Theatre of the Absurd,” it also includes novels by Samuel Beckett, Joseph Heller, Muriel Spark, James Baldwin, Kingsley Amis, Patricia Highsmith, Vladimir Nabokov, William Burroughs, Chester Himes, Jack Kerouac, Richard Wright, and Iceberg Slim. We will begin the course with Somerset Maugham’s The Razor’s Edge, Albert Camus’ The Stranger, and end with Grace Metalious’s Peyton Place and Mario Puzo’s The Godfather. In addition, we will consider both film and music culture of the period (which includes Be-bop Jazz, Elvis, Rebel Without a Cause, Rear Window, and Pillow Talk as well as the experimental work of Maya Deren, Kenneth Anger and Jean Genet). And in case this is not enough, we will also consider both contemporaneous criticism and post-50 accounts of the period. Course ends with a day-long conference with a guest speaker. 

    ENGL 599 Affect Theory
    Hennessy, Rosemary

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    Tuesdays2:30-5:20HRG 224 Hennessy, Rosemary

    Rosemary Hennessy 

     

    Reading Material: Affect Theory 

    Spring 2017   

    Course Description 

    Over the past decade or so scholarship on affect has proliferated to the point that the trend some call the “affective turn” is already being considered passé. Why all of this attention to affect? And why does it still matter to culture study?

    This seminar takes up these questions and considers some of the theories of affect that have inflected research across the humanities and social sciences.  We will be particularly interested in contributions to affect theory from the materialist tradition in culture theory.  Beginning with the materialism of Spinoza and of Marx, we will ask fairly basic questions like, what is affect and what is its relation to the material, to the body and the mind, to political economy and culture? As we turn to contemporary elaborations of historical materialist accounts, we will read approaches that posit affect as a component of labor, of cultural value, or biopolitics (Hardt and Negri; Hochschild; Gutierrez-Rodriguez; Foucault).  In the seminar’s second unit we will consider these accounts in relation to those that elaborate vitalist and phenomenological conceptions of  affect as virtual,  relational, or transcorporeal (Massumi; Bennett; Brennan; Ahmed). The final portion of the seminar will take up affect’s bearing on aesthetics and its role in specific historical formations and movements as we engage work that reads the representation and circulation of affect in literary and other cultural texts (e.g. Alaimo; Berlant; Flatley; Jameson; Wiegman.)

    The seminar aims to offer an intellectual space to become familiar with debates over how to conceptualize affect, to situate your thinking in relation to them, and develop facets of this broad topic that are pertinent to your work-in-progress.  Toward these ends, participants will be invited to do several presentations, a short paper, and one long seminar paper.

    ENGL 602 Spring Teaching Practicum

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor

    ENGL 602 - SPRING TEACHING PRACTICUM

    Long Title: SPRING TEACHING PRACTICUM
    Department: English
    Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
    Course Type: Lecture
    Credit Hours: 3
    Restrictions:
    Must be enrolled in one of the following Level(s):
    Graduate
    Description: Open only to those graduate students serving as teaching assistants for courses in English or the humanities. Repeatable for Credit.

    ENGL 604 Spring Teaching of Literature and Composition

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor

    ENGL 604 - TEACHING OF LIT & COMP

    Long Title: SPRING TEACHING OF LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION
    Department: English
    Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
    Course Type: Lecture
    Credit Hours: 3
    Restrictions:
    Must be enrolled in one of the following Level(s):
    Graduate

    Description: Open only to those graduate students teaching courses in the spring semester. 

    ENGL 704 Research Leading to Candidacy

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor

    ENGL 800 PhD Research and Thesis

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor

    Fall 2016 Graduate Courses (unofficial)

    ENGL 511: Pedagogy
    TBD

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    511TBDTBDTBD TBD

    ENGL 513: Theory and Medieval Literature: Neighbors, Strangers, Enemies in Medieval Literature
    Houlik-Ritchey

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    513TH2:30-5:30HRG 224 Houlik-Ritchey
    For the Fall 2016 detailed description click here

    ENGL 538: Romanticism in Contexts: Troubling Enlightenment
    Regier

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    538T2:30-5:30HRG 224 Regier
    For the Fall 2016 detailed course description click here

    ENGL 596: Emerson Romanticism and its Inheritors
    Wolfe

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    596M2-5HRG 224 Wolfe

    ENGL 600: Topics in Literary Theory
    Morton

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    600W2-5 Morton

    ENGL 601: Fall Teaching Practicum (for TAs)
    DGS

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    Second-year graduate students working as TAs should enroll in this course.

    ENGL 603: Fall Teaching of Literature and Composition
    DGS

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    Fourth-year grad students teaching English 175 should enroll in this course.

    ENGL 605: Third-Year Writing Workshop
    Ellenzweig

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    605W2-5 Ellenzweig

    ENGL 621: Directed Reading (faculty permission required)
    ENGLISH FACULTY

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    621as directedas directed ENGLISH FACULTY
    With the approval of their PAC, students may enroll in English 621, Directed Reading, either as a traditional directed reading course or as a 400 level English course to which a graduate component has been added. English 621 counts toward the 12 required graduate courses but does not count as a graduate seminar.

    ENGL 703: Fall Research Leading to Candidacy
    DGS

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    Pre-candidacy graduate students should enroll in 9 hours of ENGL 703/704 each semester until they have achieved candidacy. Once ABD, enroll in ENGL 800 each semester.

    ENGL 800: PhD Research and Thesis
    DGS

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ABD students should enroll in 9 credit hours of ENGL 800 each semester until they defend and submit their thesis.

    Spring 2016 Graduate Courses

    ENGL 510: Pedagogy Seminar (Spring) (3 credit hours)
    Lurie, Susan (substitute for Waligora-Davis)

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    510Thursday2:30-5:30HRG 224 Waligora-Davis

    ENGL 511: Pedagogy Practicum (Fall & Spring) 1 credit hour
    Huston

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    511as directed/tbdas directed/tbdtbd Huston

    ENGL 521: Shakespeare "Life & Its Forms in the Renaissance
    Campana

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    521Tuesday2:30-5:30HRG 224 Campana

    ENGL: 560 19th C. American: Race, Empire, Nation
    Levander

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    560Wednesday2:00-5:00HRG 224 Levander

    Spring 2016
    English 560:  American Literature: Race, Nation, Empire
     
    Dr. Caroline Levander 
    Weds 2-5:00, Herring 224 

    Course Description: Race, nation, and empire constitute a particularly robust and durable analytic framework for the study of American literature and thus have gone far toward organizing the field imaginary along a clearly delineated geopolitical axis. This course considers how these three key terms have oriented scholars' accounts of the US literary tradition over the last decades. Further, it asks: What happens if we dislocate the stable place of race, nation, and empire in US literary studies? Do these three key analytic terms provide a sufficient critical lens for understanding the rich literary production of the nineteenth-century United States?  

    We organize these questions around particular geopolitical foci and the rich and varied literary corpus that emerges around them.  Places like Antarctica, for example, engage literary writers from Edgar Allen Poe to James Fenimore Cooper among others, who draw on the scientific writings of US Exploring Expeditions (1838-42) to imagine the touch-points between this ‘last place on earth’ and the US nation project.

    ENGL 599: Studies in Literary Theory
    Wolfe

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    599Monday2:00-5:00HRG 224 Wolfe

    Spring 2016
    Instructor: Dr. Cary Wolfe
    ENGL 599: Studies in Literary Theory

    "Biopolitical Thought"

    This course will explore a range of canonical and more recent writings on 
    biopolitical thought by Michel Foucault, Giorgio Agamben, Jacques Derrida, 
    Donna Haraway, Peter Sloterdijk, Roberto Esposito, Judith Butler, and 
    others. We'll pay particular attention to the relationship of biopolitics to 
    the immunitary and autoimmunitary paradigm, governmentality, liberalism and 
    neoliberalism, sovereignty and the state of exception, the impolitical, race 
    and species difference, and control society.  Students will lead an in-class 
    discussion on an assigned reading, present a short, conference-paper style 
    summary of their seminar paper topic toward the end of the semester, and 
    complete a seminar paper of roughly twenty-five pages in length.

    ENGL 602: Spring Teaching Practicum
    Michie (Substitute for Waligora-Davis)

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    602 Waligora-Davis

    ENGL 604: Spring Teaching of Literature & Composition
    Michie (Substitute for Waligora-Davis)

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    604as directedas directedtbd Waligora-Davis

    ENGL 622: Spring Independent Study/Directed Reading
    English Dept. Faculty

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    622as directedas directedn/a ENGLISH Faculty

    ENGL 704: Spring Research Leading to Candidacy
    Michie (Substitute for Waligora-Davis)

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    704n/an/an/a Waligora-Davis

    ENGL 800: PhD Research and Thesis
    English Dept. Faculty

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    800as directedas directedtbd Waligora-Davis

    Fall 2015 Graduate Courses

    [ENGL 600, 605, and 511 are reserved for English graduate students only.]

    ENGL 511: Pedagogy Practicum
    Huston, Dennis (this change made Aug. 5, 2015)

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    511nanana Waligora-Davis, Nicole
    This course is for English grad students only.

    ENGL 532: 18th-C. British Studies:(Post) History of the English Novel
    Ellenzweig

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    532Wednesdays2-5:00 pmHRG 224 Ellenzweig, Sarah
    Fall 2015
    ENGL 532 18th Century British Studies
    (Post) History of the English Novel

    Instructor: Sarah Ellenzweig
    Wednesdays 2-5:00
     
    In a recent conference on the future of the novel, one prominent critic pronounced that work on the early English novel had reached an intellectual dead end. Do we need (she asked) more work on the novel and other early forms, on the novel and economics, the novel and the literary marketplace, the novel and women, capitalism, empire, domesticity, sexual politics? This seminar will examine the origins and rise of the English novel in the eighteenth century with an eye to future directions for the field. One focus will be the recent critique of historicism as articulated most conspicuously by the V21 collective (see http://v21collective.org/manifesto-of-the-v21-collective-ten-theses/). Our seminar will ask: how does one reinvigorate the history of the novel in an increasingly post-historicist critical climate? What might a post-historicist account of the eighteenth-century English novel look like? Are there principles and practices of historicism that we want to defend? If so, which ones and to what critical ends? What is the current role of theory in history-of-the-novel studies? If part of the recent fatigue with historicism in literary studies draws on a renewed interest in form and formalism, how does genre theory illuminate our understanding of the early novel tradition? To answer these questions, our course will read selected eighteenth-century novels alongside a range of targeted criticism and theory. Students will take turns leading the discussion of the secondary reading over the course of the semester.

    ENGL 541: Victorian Studies (topic tbd)
    Michie

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    541Mondays2-5:00HRG 224 Michie, Helena
    For detailed description of this course click here

    ENGL 599:Lit. Theory/20th C.: Avant-Gardes, Apparatus, Aesthetics
    Roof

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    599Tuesdays2:30-5:30 pm Roof, Judith
    Click here for description

    ENGL 600: Topics in Literary Theory
    Morton

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    600Tuesdays/Thursdays10:50-12:50 Morton, Tim
    This course is for English grad students only.

    ENGL 601: Fall Teaching Practicum
    English Faculty

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor

    ENGL 603: Fall Teaching of Lit. & Comp.
    English Faculty

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor

    ENGL 605: Third-Year Writing Workshop
    Campana

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    605W2:00-5:00 pm Campana, Joseph
    This course is for English grad students only.

    ENGL 621: Directed Reading
    English Faculty

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor

    ENGL 703: Fall Research Leading to Candidacy
    English Faculty

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor

    ENGL 800: PhD Research & Thesis
    English Faculty

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor