Rice University

Department of English

  • Undergraduate Courses

  • Spring 2017 Undergraduate English Courses

    Please come to our Spring 2017 Courses Preview and meet    
    English majors and our faculty on Oct. 26, 2016:     
    Lunch 12-1:00 and Cupcakes 4-5:00 in Herring Hall Room 255        

    English courses fill quickly!         

    * designates course as approved for Distribution Group 1 (d1)   

    Special note to English majors or potential English majors: Due to the popularity of ENGL 200, if the section of ENGL 200 you want appears to be full, then please contact the English department to receive a "special registration form" signed by the instructor. You can also contact the instructor directly for permission to add this course via the special registration form. 


    *ENGL 175 Global Literatures in English
    Choate; Valdez

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    *175MWF10-10:50 Choate
    *175MWF11-11:50 Valdez, E.

    Detailed description of ENGL 175 MWF 10-10:50 taught by Evan Choate:   

    *ENGL175: Global Literatures in English     

    Sex Scandals and Mistaken Identities
    Spring 2017: MWF 10:00–10:50
    Instructor: Evan Choate (ewc3@rice.edu)       

    What is the relationship between what we desire and who we are? How does sex identify us? How do we identify sex? When do our desires lead us to mistake the identities of ourselves and others? Is identity itself a fantasy that we desire? Does the identification of our desires liberate us from forces of repression? Or do the identities we desire reinforce structures of oppression? Are you confused by these questions? Good, because in this course we will be reading a range of texts in which characters, authors, and readers are confused by scandals and scandalized by confusions of the intersections of identity, sex, and desire—basic concepts that pose a persistent problem in the literature and literary movements of the last century.   

    This course moves through a genealogy of three structuring movements: modernism, postcolonialism, and postmodernism. It attends to issues of race, gender, and class as they inflect both our ways of reading and the literature itself. This wide survey of surprising encounters with the fundamental concepts of identity, sex, and desire will enable us to confront and unsettle the assumptions with which we begin the course. Our exploration of the formation and implication of literary traditions will require us to interrogate the concept of the canon,engage critically with the ways that our awareness of literary and cultural movements changes the way we read and respond to texts, and confront the structuring role of our own desires every time we sit down to read or write. This process will give students in English 175 the opportunity to strengthen their analytical skills through close reading and textual comparison, and to improve both the clarity and range of their expository writing ability.   

    Our course readings will include: Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest (1895); Virginia Woolf, Jacob’s Room (1922); Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire (1962); Tom Stoppard, Travesties (1967); Michael Ondaatje, The English Patient (1992); Brian Francis Slattery, Spaceman Blues (2007). We will also read a selection of short stories and poems by Sylvia Plath, Octavia Butler, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and others that will be made available on Owlspace. In addition to our readings, students will also engage the interdisciplinary aspects of the humanities in class through art, theatre, and film.   

    *This course is approved for distribution group 1 (d1).  

    ********************************************************* 

    Detailed description of ENGL 175 MWF 11-11:50 taught by Elena Valdez:   

    *ENGL175: Global Literatures in English MWF 11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.
    Instructor: Elena Valdez  
    Email: evv1@rice.edu 

    This course is an introduction to the study of global literatures and critical writing. In this class, we will we turn a critical eye toward the local knowledge (i.e. folklore) embedded in 20th and 21st century global literatures. The course is designed to challenge our assumptions about the relationship between the “folkloric” and the “literary” within the scope of three major literary movements: modernism, postmodernism, and postcolonialism. Throughout the semester, we will read and analyze a variety of texts that will allow students to improve their critical reading and writing skills through class discussion and several paper assignments. These discussions and assignments are structured so students will not only learn to assess how literature mediates local knowledges and practices, but also how these local knowledges and practices correspond to issues of global importance, which range from debates about race and gender to policy-making and the current state of our environment. 

    Required Texts 

    Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart (1958) 

    Sherwood Anderson, Winesburg, Ohio (1919) 

    Marsha Mehran, Pomegranate Soup (2005) 

    Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony (1977) 

    Sonia Sotomayor, My Beloved World (2013) 

    Luis Alberto Urrea, The Hummingbird’s Daughter (2005) 

    *This course is approved for distribution group 1 (d1).  

    *ENGL 200 Critical Reading and Writing
    Morton;Houlik-Ritchey; Skura

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    *200MWF1-1:50 Morton, T.
    *200TR10:50-12:05 Houlik-Ritchey
    *200TR9:25-10:40 Skura

    Course Description: The purpose of this course, *ENGL 200 is to introduce students to the scholarly study of literature though close analysis of poetry, drama, and narrative. The material we will cover is wide-ranging in terms of historical period, national origin, and subject matter. Revealing multiple layers of reality and unreality, the literature will challenge us to confront the limits of storytelling, even as it strives to innovate new methods for conveying the particularities and universalities of how we make sense of the world. Our task will be to analyze this complexity through close, careful reading and to apply an evolving set of critical concepts toward deeper, more precise understandings of the techniques writers deploy to capture some of the most mysterious and difficult aspects of human experience.
      
    This course is recently approved for group 1 distribution.
     

    * Note to English majors or potential English majors: if the section of ENGL 200 you want is full, or if you need in this course, but the course appears to be full, then please contact the English department to receive a special permission form signed by the instructor.

     

    ENGL 204 Forms of Poetry
    Otremba

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 204TR10:50-12:05 Otremba

    ENGL 204 - FORMS OF POETRY

    Long Title: FORMS OF POETRY
    Department: English
    Grade Mode: Standard Letter
    Course Type: Seminar
    Credit Hours: 3
    Restrictions:
    May not be enrolled in one of the following Level(s):
    Graduate
    Description: This course examines the fundamental architecture of poetry. How do poets create a sense of shape? What are the nuts and bolts of a poem? Students will read widely in the history of poetry from traditional meters and historical forms to contemporary free verse and experimental or open forms. Part workshop and part seminar, this course will feature critical and creative assignments and is designed for majors and non-majors, writers and non-writers alike.

    ENGL 245 Interdiscpl. Approaches: "Gender, Tech & Med. Humanities"
    Beroiza, A.

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 245/HURC 245TR 2:30-3:45 Beroiza, A.
    Course description: This course offers an introduction to the concept of gender at the intersection of medicine and technology in the 20th and 21st centuries. We begin by asking when and how human bodies, sexual behaviors, and personal identities became subjects of medical interest in the modern Western world. Following a brief introduction to pre-Enlightenment studies of human sexual anatomies, behaviors, and pleasures, we turn to 19th century medical research on sexual “degeneracies” and “disorders” that served as a foundation for the work of early 20th century sexologists such as Havelock Ellis and Magnus Hirschfeld, and the founder of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud. We consider how early sexological and psychoanalytic discoveries and diagnoses—such as the concept of inversion, or the Oedipal theory of sexual development—influenced popular understandings of gender, sex, and sexuality at the beginning of the 20th century. This course is crosslisted with HURC 245. 

    *ENGL 250 Masterworks of Fiction
    Pett

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    *ENGL 200MWF2-2:50 Pett
    Course description: What is the genre of fiction? What makes certain works “masterful”? How and when should we read fiction as a medium for commentary and critique? This course participates in the ongoing debate about the status, nature, and politics of fiction as a force for social change. The Readings comprise notable works from the early nineteenth-century to the present, with an emphasis on texts preoccupied with themes of nation, identity, discovery, desire and belonging. These themes will manifest themselves in a number of ways: plots driven by secret mutinies and religious awakenings; efforts to evade or abet agents of slavery systems; eruptions and disruptions of institutionalized prejudice; and characters who are voyeuristically engrossed in other people’s lives. This course (ENGL 250) is approved for distribution group 1 (d1).

    ENGL 299 English Lit. & Public Humanities: "Curating Heritage"
    Chappell, L.

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 299/HURC 299MW4-5:15 Chappell, L.

    Spring 2017
    ENGL 299/HURC 299  English Literature & Public Humanities: Curating Heritage
    Instructor: Lindsey Chappel
    Mondays & Wednesdays 4-5:15

    Cultural heritage objects are far from trivial. On August 24, 2015, the BBC reported that ISIS militants had destroyed the nearly 2,000 year-old temple of Baalshamin at Palmyra, a UNESCO World Heritage site that lies in the middle of the Syrian Desert. This destruction of sacred, ancient objects, ISIS claimed, was an attack against a dangerous material heritage. The cultural agency at the United Nations has declared this latest attack on Middle Eastern antiquities a “war crime.”

    The curation of heritage objects, though, can spark political tension even when the objects themselves are not deemed threatening or contentious. Great Britain, for example, is engaged in a 200 year-old dispute with Greece over the former empire’s continued possession of the Elgin Marbles, removed from the Parthenon in 1801. Both Britain and Greece claim rightful ownership over these artifacts, recognizing their significance to Western cultural heritage.

    In this course, we will investigate how heritage objects—and their arrangement and display as public narratives—can produce a collective sense of identity and belonging. We will engage with questions such as: How is cultural identity policed, by whom, and to what ends (historically and in the present)? How can objects become sacred or dangerous? How can they contain cultural identity and history? What are the logics, forms, and objectives that structure exhibition? How are cultural heritages constructed and deconstructed through the curation and exhibition of objects? Through a combination of museum visits, literature, and theory in each unit, we’ll analyze how institutions curate cultural heritage through the exhibition of antique objects. At the end of the course, we will think about the ethics and rhetoric of arrangement, possession, and exhibition theoretically and practically to produce our own virtual heritage exhibits. 

    ENGL 300 Practices of Literary Study
    Roof; Morris

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 300TR1-2:15 Roof
    ENGL 300TR9:25-10:40 Morris, W.

    ENGL 300 - PRACTICES OF LITERARY STUDY

    Long Title: PRACTICES OF LITERARY STUDY: READING METHODS
    Department: English
    Grade Mode: Standard Letter
    Course Type: Seminar
    Credit Hours: 3
    Restrictions:
    May not be enrolled in one of the following Level(s):
    Graduate
    Description: A course that identifies and explores key concepts of recent critical writing. Students read short texts of contemporary theory and discuss the relation between theory and literature. Required for English majors.
     

    ENGL 301 Introduction to Fiction Writing
    Schimmel

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 301Mondays5-7:50WSC 146 Schimmel
    ENGl 301Wednesdays3-5:50WSC 146 Schimmel

    Spring 2017
    ENGL 301 Intro to Fiction Writing (two sections Spring ’17)
    (Limited enrollment)
     
    Instructor: Schimmel, Ian (will teach both sections)

    This class will devote itself to the study of fiction writing, specifically the short story form.  By looking to other writers as models, you will learn how to craft your own imaginative, well-written narratives. In many ways, this class will operate much like an artists’ studio. You will practice the art of fiction as much as you will study it. You will be throwing paint on the canvass, making mistakes, and getting messy. You will work with different literary techniques and styles to explore and hone your own craft. This growth will come about through experimentation and sharing of your personal work, and by studying and reflecting on the work of masters as well as that of your peers’.Through this course you will become a more active and involved reader, a more careful and skilled writer, and ultimately, a clearer participant in your own life.  You will enhance your ability to criticize your own work and understand how to refine your art to better meet the demands of your peers, and yourself. You will learn how to balance the acts of imagination necessary for generating ideas with the formal discipline needed to realize your artistic ambitions. The ultimate goal of this course is for you to write as deeply and thoughtfully and imaginatively as you can.

    ENGL 302 Screenwriting
    Dermont

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 302Tuesdays2:30-5:20 Dermont

    Spring 2017

    ENGL 302 Intro to Screenwriting

    Instructor: Amber Dermont

    This course will introduce students to the art and craft of screenwriting through a focused study of terminology, dramatic structure and cinematic technique. Assignments will include weekly viewing of films and readings of original/adapted screenplays and source materials. Through weekly writing assignments, tudents will compose their own pitches, treatments, outlines and will draft the first act of a full-length screenplay. Films viewed may include: Casablanca, Annie Hall, Pulp Fiction, Election, Blade Runner, Jaws, Fresh, The Squid and The Whale, The Fantastic Mr. Fox, The Talented Mr. Ripley, Memento, Good Fellas, Gladiator, The Town and No Country for Old Men

    ENGL 305 Introduction to Creative Nonfiction Writing
    Johnson, L.

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 305Thursdays1-3:50 Johnson, L.

    Spring 2017 

    English 305: Introduction to Creative Nonfiction 

    Thursdays, 1:00-3:50 

    Lacy M. Johnson, PhD, lacy.johnson@rice.edu 

    David Shields is fond of criticizing the label “Creative Nonfiction,” saying: “it’s like having one drawer in your dresser labeled ‘socks,’ and one other drawer labeled ‘non-socks.’” The term “Creative Nonfiction” is, indeed, unwieldy, since we use it to encompass at least all of the following sub-genres: memoir, personal essay, lyric essay, literary journalism, profiles, historical narrative, travel essay, nature writing, writing for radio, science writing, and cultural critique. Though disparate, what all of these sub-genres have in common is a shared set of questions about truth. 

    If we have learned anything from scandals in the nonfiction world (James Frey, Margaret Jones, Jonah Lehrer, etc.), writers of nonfiction are expected to only ever tell the complete, unaltered truth. However, when we look to masters of the form, we see that their work is often not so much marked by truth as truthiness (to use Stephen Colbert’s term), which means that the driving force isn’t necessarily so much the facts about a given matter (facts themselves are not inherently interesting anyway) so much as an inquiry about how they might be understood. 

    In this workshop we’ll explore what “truth” means to writers working across many subgenres of creative nonfiction, and we’ll work to put our powers of observation, narration, reportage, and research to work in service of this broad and nebulous aim.

    ENGL 306 Topics in Fiction Writing: "The Graphic Novel"
    Dermont

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 306Wednesdays3-5:50 Dermont

    ENGL 309 Topics in Nonfiction Writing: "Nonfiction Nature Writing"
    Johnson, L.

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 309 Tuesdays1-3:50 Johnson, L.

    Spring 2017 

    English 309: Topics in Creative Nonfiction 

    Nonfiction Nature Writing 

    Tuesdays, 1:00-3:50 

    Lacy M. Johnson, PhD, lacy.johnson@rice.edu 

    The human condition appears perhaps nowhere more mysterious and self-evident than in its relationship to the wild world, and in this creative writing workshop, we’ll explore some of the ways that creative nonfiction can become a vehicle for questions about these relationships, as well as those between memory and landscape, politics and place, and inclusion and exile. We’ll look at some of the myriad ways these intersections have been documented in essays, memoirs, and narrative nonfiction. As we consider these texts, our emphasis will be on finding ways to articulate and deepen our individual and shared relationships to the uncultivated world. To that end, we’ll spend considerable time this semester outdoors, including, perhaps, foraging for wild plants, planting marsh grass, and studying native ecosystems. But more than anything else, this is a course in storytelling, and we will learn to tell stories that navigate the precarious terrain of personal experience, observation, science, memory, and facts. Students should be prepared to wade into the muck of swamps, and to become mired in the complexity and contradictions of nature, including and especially our own.

    ENGL 311 Topics in Medieval Lit. & Cult: "Race in the Middle Ages"
    Houlik-Ritchey

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 311TR1-2:15 Houlik-Ritchey

    Spring 2017

    ENGL 311 Topics in Medieval Literature  & Culture

    Instructor: Emily Houlik-Ritchey 

    Race in the Middle Ages

    Racial discourses and tensions have received, and continue to warrant, the thoughtful critical attention of students, scholars, activists, politicians, and other public figures. In such a climate it behooves us also to turn our attention to the question of how old these racial discourses are, and how they have changed/morphed over time. {What I just said implies that there is a kind of  continuity to racial discourse across the centuries… but is that so?} Whether there can even be said to be a discourse of something we can properly call “race” in the Middle Ages is a debate that has received a fair amount of attention across the fields of medieval studies. Some scholars would say, “No, ‘race’ is a later phenomenon.” {I am not one of those people, but nor do I think we are dealing with a continuous linear development…} Taking the English literary canon as our primary field of inquiry, we will proceed from a working hypothesis that there was a concept of race in the Middle Ages, and endeavor to describe and interrogate both its appearance and its cultural function within medieval English literature. How do medieval (primarily English) racial discourses conceive of difference? Was race malleable in the Middle Ages? Was it embodied? How did medieval (English) societies negotiate racial differences in their literature? What does this reveal about the overall function of racial discourses, both within the English Middle Ages and now?

    *ENGL 321 Early Shakespeare
    Skura

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    *ENGL 321TR2:30-3:45 Skura

    Spring 2017

    ENGL 321 Early Shakespeare

    Instructor: Meredith Skura

    Elizabethan and Jacobean England produced the greatest plays in English--perhaps in any language--and nurtured a theater more closely integrated into its society than any we have known since.  We will explore the literary, dramatic and cultural achievements in a selection of Shakespeare’s earlier work, following his development into the period’s most successful playwright.

    This course satisfies the English major pre1800/1900 requirement

    ENGL 325 Exeter Study Abroad via Rice Study Abroad Program
    Exeter Faculty

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 325 Exeter Faculty

    Study Abroad Program for English Majors at the University of Exeter 

    English majors may opt to spend the spring semester of their junior year at the University of Exeter in the U.K. Students planning to do so should complete ENGL 200 and ENGL 300 by the fall semester of their junior year (the semester preceding study abroad). At Exeter, students will take two courses or modules (each worth 30 Exeter credits) from Rice’s approved list of Exeter Courses.

    The approved courses taken abroad will transfer back to Rice and will appear on the Rice transcript as special transfer credit. The English department has obtained special transfer credit status for these courses in that the final grades received on the Exeter transcript will be counted in the student’s Rice GPA. The two Exeter courses will be articulated as ENGL 325 (two instances of 3 semester credit hours each) with the remaining hours articulated as general TRAN credit. With pre-approval from the Department, ENGL 325 may additionally count toward elective and field requirements of the major in the following ways:

    1. The two instances of ENGL 325, of 3 semester credit hours each, can count as general electives in the English major (as 2 courses at the 300 level), or
    2. The two instances of ENGL 325 may be used, depending on their topical focus, to fulfill up to 2 field distribution requirements of the Major (pre-1800, pre-1900, or non-canonical).

    Please refer to the Rice English Department website (http://www.english.rice.edu) for instructions and pre-requisites for applying to the Rice-Exeter program.

    ENGL 328 Milton
    Snow

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 328TR10:50-12:05 Snow

    Spring 2017

    ENGL 328 Milton 

    Instructor: Ed Snow

    Reading List: 

    Milton, Paradise Lost, ed. Fowler (Longmans)

    Hill, The World Turned Upside Down, (Penquin)

    Misc. Critical Readings (xerox)

    Course Description: 

    This course should really be called “The Other Milton,” since we will be interested in all those errant tendencies in the poet’s work—iconoclastic, feminist, evolutionary, secular-humanist, open-ended, polysemic, deconstructive—that complicate the straight-down-the-middle sensibility (authoritarian, patriarchal) that “Milton” usually signifies. We will concentrate entirely on Paradise Lost, since it takes a semester to even begin to read one’s way into this amazing work. We will deal with historical, political and theological contexts, but our focus will be on close/slow reading; thus the course will be as much about how poetry in general tends to work as about Milton’s particular strategies. We will be especially concerned with how issues of gender play out at the level of “minute particulars” (Blake’s phrase) in our two chosen works.  Written work for the course will consist of 3-5 page informal class-to-class assignments and two 5-10 page graded papers. There will be no midterm or final.

    *ENGL 341 Victorian Literature & Culture
    Browning, L.

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    *ENGL 341MWF11-11:50 Browning

    Spring 2017
    ENGL 341: Victorian Literature and Culture        
    Instructor: Logan Browning

    We will explore some of the preoccupations and controversies of the Victorian era in Britain (1837-1901) through a study of three key literary texts (Dickens’s Oliver Twist [1837-38], Alfred Tennyson’s In Memoriam [1850], and Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest [1895]) along with a variety of verbal and visual texts drawn from a wide range of sources. These associated texts will include journalism, history, caricature, advertising, book and magazine illustration, and political speeches. Topics for reading and discussion will include Victorian ideas about the city, social organization, gender and sexuality, public health, empire (especially including Anglo-Indian relations), technological change (particularly the coming of the railways), and evolutionary science.  The writing for the class will require both research and critical thinking with the goal of illuminating connections between our key and associated texts in order to enhance our understanding of Victorian Culture.

    Students are encouraged to purchase Norton Critical editions of the three key texts. The associated texts will be available either online or in a course pack.

    ENGL 343 Austen's Worlds
    Michie

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 343/SWGSMW2-3:15 Michie

    Jane Austen’s Worlds

    English 343, Spring 2017

    Helena Michie

    MW 2-3:15  [NEW TIME SLOT]

     This course will try to come to terms with Jane Austen as author and as icon. We will read all her published fiction, as well as some of the stories she produced as a child, and will work with her letters and her biography. This course will also be something of a Jane Austen Film Festival: we will look carefully and critically at the recent film and television adaptations of her novels.  The course’s bifocal approach will allow us to read Austen's work in two historical contexts: Regency England, which provides a rich background for the political, social, sexual, and formal elements of her work, and the contemporary United States, where she was voted by People one of the Twenty-five Most Intriguing People of 1995 and where she continues to be a presence in  cultural artifacts form memes and web narratives to calendars and perfumes.

     

    BOOKS AND VISUAL ADAPTATIONS

    By Jane Austen: Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice. Northanger Abbey. Mansfield Park, Emma, Persuasion, Juvenilia and other unpublished works. 

    Direct Adaptations: Sense and Sensibility (Ang Lee, 1995); Pride and Prejudice (A&E Miniseries, 1996); Pride and Prejudice (Joe Wright, 2005);Northanger Abbey (Giles Foster, 1987) ; Mansfield Park (Patricia Rozema, 1999); Emma (Douglas McGrath, 1996); Jane Austens Emma (Diarmuid Lawrence, 1997); Persuasion (Robert Michell, 1995)

    Modernizations: Clueless (Amy Heckerling, 1995);Bridget Jones’s Diary (Sharon Maguire, 2001); Bride and Prejudice (Gurinder Chadha, 2004)

    Other: Lost in Austen ( Dan Zeff 2008); Becoming Jane (Julian Jarrold, 2007);

    Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (Peter Weir, 2003) 

    ENGL 354 Queer Literary Cultures
    Lamos

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 354/SWGS 364MWF10-10:50 lamos

    ENGL 354 - QUEER LITERARY CULTURES

    Long Title: QUEER LITERARY CULTURES 
    Department: English 
    Grade Mode: Standard Letter 
    Course Type: Lecture 
    Credit Hours: 3 
    Restrictions:
    May not be enrolled in one of the following Level(s): 
    Graduate 
    Description: An introduction to queer literary theory by reading works in several genres, from Sappho to the present day, including Shakespeare, Dickinson, Tennyson, Whitman, Proust, Stein and Woolf. Cross-list: SWGS 364. 

    *ENGL 355 Modern Short Fiction: Ethics of Fiction
    Harter, D.

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    *ENGL 355/FRENTR4-5:15 Harter

    ENGL 355 - MODERN SHORT STORY
    Long Title: MODERN SHORT STORY: TOWARDS AN ETHICS OF FICTION 

    Department: English
    Grade Mode: Standard Letter
    Course Type: Lecture
    Distribution Group: Distribution Group I
    Credit Hours: 3
    Restrictions:
    May not be enrolled in one of the following Level(s):
    Graduate
    Description: Study of great modern short fiction with emphasis on reading as an ethical enterprise. Selected critical essays complement works from Melville to Maupassant, Flaubert to Kafka to O'Connor as we talk about alienation and solitude, death and violence and the vicissitudes of family. Does not count toward French major. Cross-list: FREN 355. Recommended Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level course or above in English or French Studies, or HUMA 101 or 102.

    *ENGL 357 Origins of the Postmodern
    Morris, W.

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    *ENGL 357Thursdays2:30-5:20 Morris, W.

    Spring 2017

    ENGLISH 357: ORIGIN OF THE POSTMODERN 

    Thursdays 2:30 – 5:20

    Instructor: Wesley Morris 

    The postmodern is less a period than a concept, less a concept than a purposeful misreading of modernism, and less a misreading of modernism than a random series of expressive acts.  From certain entertaining items embedded in this random series of expressive acts, we will uncover a few misreadings of modernism, some interesting aspects of a postmodern concept, and a rough estimate of a postmodern period, all of which will lead us to an adequate, if incomplete, understanding of postmodernism.  The entertaining items include, but are not limited to, a fairy tale (The Three Pigs), two theatrical pieces (Waiting for Godot and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead), music (Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band and other 60s pop music), a postmodern essay on a surrealist artist (This is Not a Pipe), three novels (The Crying of Lot 49Snow White, and Mao II), and four movies (Rebel Without a Cause,  Blow-UpBlow Out, and Blade Runner). 

    *ENGL 361 American Literature 1860-1910
    Johnson, A.

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    *ENGL 361TR 10:50-12:05 Johnson, A.

    Spring 2017

    ENGL 361: American Literature 1860-1910

    Instructor: Amanda Johnson

    Realism & Romance 

    This course tracks the romantic and realist strands of American literature from 1860 to 1910. Southern nostalgia after Reconstruction, as well as the “Closing of the West,” generated romance narratives with varying social agendas. African-American authors held dreams of black integration and black separatism after the Civil War and Reconstruction. The popularity of Freud and other social scientists helped authors depict “realistic” novel characters, and posited the irrational nature of human psychological fantasies. America’s rapid urbanization and industrialization, finally, begat narratives of social realism that, in their unflinching brutality, bespeak the excess of romance. By reading war poetry, novels, literary criticism, and other nonfiction texts, we study how realism and romance compete and collaborate with each other. Ultimately, this analysis will yield the implications of realism and romance for race, gender, regional identity, economics, social science, and narrative theory.

    * this course satisfies the English major pre1800/1900 requirement

    ENGL 364 American Poetry 1910-1960
    Derrick

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 364TR9:25-10;40 Derrick

    Spring 2017

    English 364:  American Poetry, 1910-1960
    Tuesday-Thursday, 9:25-10:40  

    Scott Derrick, Herring 329  derrick@rice.edu   

    Description   

                US poetry in the modernist period is remarkable stuff, produced by such writers as HD, Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, Hart Crane, Langston Hughes, Jean Toomer, Elizabeth Bishop, William Carlos Williams, Sylvia Plath, and a host of others.  We’ll read as much of it as seems consistent with careful attention both to the content of individual poems and to whatever broader contexts-- aesthetic, cultural, and political-- help one make sense of what individual poems and poets attempt. We’ll pay some attention to lyrics of popular songs in the period as (in the age of the phonograph and radio) the form in which most persons consume their poetry.  We’ll also look at some proletarian poetry of the period—to poems that attempt to address the material crisis of the culture.  Some experimental writing of verse is a possibility as an aid to understanding, though no experience or skill at this is required or expected.   

    Requirements for the course    

    Two short papers; a slightly longer final paper or project; and regular attendance and participation.   

    ENGL 371 Survey of Chicana/o Literature
    Aranda

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 371MWF11-11:50 Aranda

    ENGL 375 Film and Literature
    Snow

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 375TR1-2;15HRG 224 Snow

    Spring 2017 

    ENGL 375 Film & Literature 

    TTH 1-2:20  HRG 224

    Instructor: Dr. Snow    email: edsnow@rice.edu  

    Course Description:  

    Despite the title of this course, it is conceived unapologetically as a course in film. The goal is to saturate ourselves with the absolute best that film has been capable of since 1930 (i.e. we won’t attempt to tackle silent cinema), in order to acquire both an intuitive feeling and an empirical understanding for what a great film really is.  All the films we'll view are "best" films and immediately, often wrenchingly, accessible as such. The syllabus, then, is basically a "top 10" list, even though your're not likely to find many of its films on most of such lists. Since I've only taught this course a few times at Rice, I'll need you to tell me at the end of the semester which of the films you think belling here (as well as any obvious films you think are missing).  

    P.S.: We will read literature, when the occasion presents itself--e.g.,when  a film is based on a book or a play, or when a shooting script is available, we will read all or at least part of the source material.  And we'll be reading around constantly in the literature of film.  

     

    ENGL 381 Virginia Wolfe & Company
    Lamos

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 381MWF2-2:50 Lamos

    Virginia Woolf & Company  

    ENGL 381/SWGS 327                                                                         
    Prof. Colleen R. Lamos                                                                                             lamos@rice.edu           

    Course Description                                           

                The most prominent women writer of the Twentieth Century, Virginia Woolf was the center of a network of artists, muscians, intellectuals, and authors.  Known as the “Bloomsbury Group” after the area in London where many of them lived, they were friends, collaborators, interlocutors, promoters, and, sometimes, lovers.  Including E. M. Forster, Vanessa Bell, and Lytton Strachey, the Bloomsbury set was the cutting edge of artistic and social change in the 1920s. 

                In this course, we will study works by Woolf and the company she kept: Katherine Mansfield, T. S. Eliot, and Ethel Smyth, among others.  We will explore the influence of her artistic and personal relationships on her aesthetic and political ideas in, for instance, Orlando, Woolf’s fictional biography of her mistress, Vita Sackville West. 

                How did Woolf’s close involvement with Bloomsbury intersect with her aesthetic experiments as well as with her analyses of the politics of gender, class, sexuality, nationality, and race? 

                You will be introduced to a cross-section of modernist art and to an important era in feminist history.  Most of our class time will be spent discussing the assigned texts; when necessary, I will deliver short lectures to provide you with the relevant historical, social, and literary contexts.  We will focus on fostering two important, basic skills: close, careful reading of literature, and critical writing—that is, examining literary texts analytically and in relation to their social and historical contexts. 

    *ENGL 386 Medical Media Arts Lab (4 credit hours)
    Ostherr

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    *ENGL 386/FILM381TR + LAB: TBD in CLASSTR 2:30-3:45 + LAB TBD Ostherr

    Spring 2017 

    Instructor: Prof. Kirsten Ostherr                      

    Tu/Th 2:30-3:50 

    Moody Center for the Arts 

    Medical Media Arts Lab is a hands-on critical thinking and design class for students with arts, media, writing, design & programming interests or skills who would like to apply and refine their abilities by tackling real-world problems with physicians & patients in the Texas Medical Center who want help visualizing information for health communication.

    Working in teams in collaboration with health & design mentors, students will develop projects that may include short videos, infographics, app development, 3-D virtual models, creative writing, and other media arts. 

    This class is a unique opportunity for students interested in medical humanities, health professions & media, but no pre-med or design background is required. The multidisciplinary faculty team includes visual artist Allison Hunter, engineer-designer Dr. Matthew Wettergreen, communication expert Dr. Tracy Volz, and health entrepreneur Dr. Binata Mukherjee. Community mentors will include Dr. Bryan Vartabedian and Dr. Peter Killloran, as well as hackers, designers, & other clinicians from Baylor College of Medicine, UT Health, MD Anderson, Texas Children’s Hospital, and the Veterans Administration.

    More info: kostherr@rice.edu 

    ENGL 397 Topics in Lit. and Culture: "Transatlantic Literature"
    Johnson, A.

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 397TR4-5:15 Johnson, A.

    Spring 2017
    ENGL 397 Topics in Literature and Culture: Transatlantic Literature*
    Instructor: Amanda Johnson

    In 1946, Winston Churchill declared the U.S. and the U.K. had “a special relationship” that would determine their cooperation in global affairs. American independence, it seems, did not end the complex interactions between America and Britain in terms of politics, economics, and cultural exchange. American readers avidly consumed British literature, and British texts got rewritten by authors living in the American hemisphere. In this course, we will study authors who have been claimed by both sides of the Atlantic, exploring how their texts proclaim or contest a hybrid identity. We will also explore how calling an author “British” or “American” influences our reception of their texts. Finally, we will investigate how, in this age of economic globalization and widespread immigration, defenders of national literatures are pushing back against a transatlantic perspective. In many ways, it seems that the United States and the United Kingdom are two countries divided by a common literature.

    * This course will satisfy the noncanonical requirement for the English major Spring 2017.

    ENGL 401 Adv. Fict. Writing: "Narrative Design in Long(er) Fictions
    Cronin, J.

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 401 Mondays2-4:50 Cronin

    Spring 2017
    ENGL 401 Adv. Fiction Writing: Narrative Design in Longer Fictions
    Class meets: Mondays 2-4:50

    Instructor: Justin Cronin   passagetx@gmail.com 

    *Special instructions for students interested in this course 

    This is a course in how to design and execute the writing of a novel.  Over the course of the semester, each student will design the entirety of an original novel in the genre of their choice and write approximately 80 pages of the text.   (Act one and the beginnings of act two.)  We will read a number of books from several genres (including YA, midlist literary fiction, science fiction, coming-of-age, and crime) and discuss their construction.  The students themselves will generate some of the reading list. There will be a great deal of group brainstorming work and discussion of the creative and planning processes that together produce viable longer fictions.  There will also be some discussion of the publishing industry.  There is no expectation that the work that students produce will be especially literary (whatever that means) or, for that matter, successful (i.e. “good”).  Perhaps these things will happen.  But the chief concern of the course is for students to experience the way in which a novel is actually made.

    *The class is limited to 12 students, by permission of the instructor.  An intermediate level fiction-writing course (presumably in the writing of the short story) is generally required, though exceptions can be made.  All interested students should come to the first class meeting, where they will learn how to apply for admission to the course.  Special registration forms will be used. 

    ENGL 404 Adv. Poetry Writing
    Otremba

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 404Thursdays1-3:30 Otremba

    Spring 2017

    ENGL 404  Advanced Poetry Writing
    Instructor: Otremba, Paul

    This is a theme-based poetry workshop that will have an emphasis on contemporary “documentary poetics”. Documentary poetics is not a particular poetic school or clearly defined subgenre of poetry; instead, we might consider documentary poetics to be a mode of poetry that takes as its motivation the spirit of journalism, documentary film, and poetry of witness. From journalism and documentary film, documentary poetics adopts the use of testimonials and evidential documents as sources of its language and subject matter. Being influenced by these non-poetic media, documentary poetics is also highly open to experiments with the genre, to opening up poetry to include unconventional discourses and innovative means of organizing and presenting poems. From the poetry of witness, documentary poetics has taken on the ethical imperative to look unflinchingly at the world, not avoiding trauma, atrocity and extremity, often with a political, social and global awareness. This semester, we will read examples of poems that practice documentary poetics as well as poems that have had bearing on the mode, such as ballads, collages, and ekphrasis poems. Through a combination of poem exercises, research, conventional workshops, and individual meetings, you will develop a group of poems that investigates a subject of your choosing.

    Prerequisite of ENGL 304 is required, or permission of instructor via special registration form

    ENGL 493 Indep. Study/Directed Reading
    English Faculty

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 493 as directedas directedn/a English Faculty

    ENGL 493 - INDEPENDENT STUDY/DIR READING

    Long Title: INDEPENDENT STUDY/DIRECTED READING
    Department: English
    Grade Mode: Standard Letter
    Course Type: Independent Study
    Credit Hours: 1 TO 6
    Restrictions:
    May not be enrolled in one of the following Level(s):
    Graduate
    Description: A variable-credit course designed for students who want to pursue intensive semester-long study of a particular topic not included in the curriculum. Students must identify and receive the approval of an English department faculty member. Instructor and Department approval must be granted prior to registration. Instructor Permission Required. Repeatable for Credit.

    ENGL 466 Topics in Amer. Literature: Morrison/Faulkner
    Waligora-Davis

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 466 CapstoneMondays2-4:30 Waligora-Davis


    Spring 2017 

    ENGL 466 Topics in American Literature: Morrison/Faulkner
    Instructor: Nicole Waligora-Davis
    Mondays 2-4:30 

    This seminar places in conversation the writings of William Faulkner and Toni Morrison on race, gender, history and American legal culture. From Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom and Go Down Moses to Morrison’s The Bluest Eye and “The Fisherwoman” our work will carry us from the Haitian Revolution to the American Civil War, from WW1 to the early Civil Rights movement, from Dred Scott and Plessy v. Ferguson to Brown v. Board of Education and Virginia vs. Loving, from doll studies and miscegenation to lynching and kangaroo justice. We will track the implications of race and gender on poverty, homelessness, colonialism, segregation, aesthetics, and citizenship and due process. Our readings will include but not limited to Light in August, As I lay Dying, Absalom, Absalom!, Intruder in the Dust; Go Down Moses, Sula, Jazz, The Bluest Eye, A Mercy, Home; in addition to the related critical theory, contemporary film, photography, and music.  Writing a research intensive, this course culminates with a required 15-20 page critical research project. 

     

    ENGL 497 Topics in Lit. and Cult.: Literatures of Environmental Justice
    Comer, K.

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 497 CapstoneTR10:50-12:05 Comer

    English 497 Literatures of Environmental Justice 

    Dr. Comer (kcomer@rice.edu) 

    T/Th 10:50-12:05, Spring 2017  

    Course for majors. Open to non-majors by permission (email Instructor).

    Elective Course for Environmental Studies Minor

    Satisfies SWGS Critical Race or Feminist Theory Requirement

    What are the prospects for democracy in an era of “tough oil,” rising seas, and widespread toxicity? How might grassroots movements create allies?  

    These are questions of science, politics, but also of imagination. Given they ask us to respond to conditions that defy human ability to conceive them, our course turns for guidance to literature, film, and art. We take up contemporary novels, memoirs, films, and science fiction (climate fiction) through critical approaches informed by movements for environmental health, racial, and climate justice.  Feminist analyses and critical race and indigenous feminisms provide particular departure points on questions of environmental privilege.  Our readings draw from across the Global South and North – showcasing relative powers and risks for writers who are environmental activists. Geographic range shows as well how new eco-activist audiences or “publics” come into being.  Social media activism and genres of writing contribute to our theorization of activist world-building.   

    Our perspective is necessarily global, even as our focus is place-based and regional.  Data gathering, activist mobilization, toxic flows, typically impact particular places, particular bodies. Factors of race, class, and geographical “home,” correlate to unequal toxic locales. We will learn about new forms of political affinity and social life, new ways to think about humans and non-human relations, and about “Green” and “Blue” (Oceanic) Humanities. Related concepts: scale, transcorporeality, slow violence, sovereignty, speculative realism. 

    Assignments  A major research paper (15-20 pages).  (Will be divided into 4 steps) 

    Possible Reading/Screening List 

    Literature:  Audre Lorde, The Cancer Journals (1980), Ken Saro-Wiwa, A Month and A Day (1995), Clifton Evers, NOtes to a Young Surfer (2010), Indra Sinha’s Animal’s People (2007), Helena Maria Viramontes, Under the Feet of Jesus (1996), Gerald Vizenor, Hiroshima’s Bugi, CormacMcCarthy, The Road (2006), Terry Tempest Williams Refuge (1992).                    

    Films: Safe (1995); Heart of the Sea: Kapolioka'ehukai (2002); Tipping Point: The End of Oil (2011); Deepwater Horizon (2016).   


    ENGL 200 and ENGL 300 are suggested prerequisites for this advanced English major seminar. Exceptions can be made by the instructor. Class size is limited to approximately 10.

    ENGL 495 Senior Thesis Completion (prerequisite is ENGL 494)
    English Faculty

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 495 Spring Semester onlyas directedas directed English Faculty

    ENGL 495 - SENIOR THESIS/Spring semester only
     (prerequisite ENGL 494)

    Long Title: SENIOR THESIS
    Department: English
    Grade Mode: Standard Letter
    Course Type: Research
    Credit Hours: 3
    Restrictions:
    May not be enrolled in one of the following Level(s):
    Graduate
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 200 AND ENGL 300 AND (ENGL 493 OR ENGL 494)
    Description: Writing and completion of a substantive research project under the supervision of a member of the English department. Prior approval of instructor and department approval must be granted prior to registration. Consult English department website for procedures and application. Instructor and department approval must be granted prior to registration. Prerequisites: ENGL 200; ENGL 300; ENGL 493 or 494. Instructor Permission Required. Repeatable for Credit.

    Fall 2016 Undergraduate Courses

    *approved for d1 (Distribution Group 1) 
    ** Proposed/Unofficial Spring 2017 English Major Capstones

    *ENGL 175: Global Literatures in English (2 sections offered in Fall)
    Celeste/Miller

    *ENGL 200: Critical Reading and Writing
    Ellenzweig/Logan/Derrick

    ENGL 201: Introduction to Creative Writing
    Schimmel

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    201MW4-5:30 Schimmel
    For the Fall 2016 detailed description click here

    *ENGL 210: Major British Writers: Chaucer-1800
    Browning

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    210MWF11-11:50 Browning
    For detailed Fall 2016 course description click here

    *ENGL 251: Masterworks of Poetry
    Otremba

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    251MWF1-1:50 Otremba
    For the Fall 2016 detailed course description click here

    *ENGL 260: Intro to American Literature
    Carson, Joseph

    *ENGL 270: Aspects of Modern Literature
    Hagan, J.

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    270TR1-2:15 Hagan, J.
    For the detailed Fall 2016 description click here

    *ENGL 272: Literature and Medicine
    Conrad

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    272TTH4-5:15 Conrad
    For the Fall 2016 detailed description click here

    *ENGL 273: Medicine and Media
    Ostherr

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    273TTH10:50-12:05 Ostherr
    For the Fall 2016 detailed description of this course click here

    ENGL 300: Practices of Literary Study
    Hennessy/Lurie

    ENGL 301: Introduction to Fiction Writing
    Schimmel/Dermont

    ENGL 304: Introduction to Poetry Writing
    Otremba

    ENGL 305: Intro to Creative Nonfiction Writing
    Johnson, Lacy (new creative writing instructor)

    ENGL 306: Topics in Fiction Writing/Fairy Tale Workshop
    Dermont

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    306Tuesday6-9:00 Dermont

    ENGL 314/MDEM 319: Medieval Romance
    Houlik-Ritchey

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    314TTH9:25-10:40 Houlik-Ritchey
    For the Fall 2016 detailed course description click here

    *ENGL 322: Late Shakespeare
    Snow

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    322TTH10:40-12:05 Snow

    ENGL 343: Austen (Jane Austen's Worlds)
    Cancelled!

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor



    *ENGL 346: 20th Century British Literature
    Boyd, Sydney

    ENGL 350: Survey of European Fiction: 20th Century Europe
    Cancelled!

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor



    *ENGL 360: American Literature Before 1860
    Johnson

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    360MWF10-10:50 Johnson, Amanda
    For Fall 2016 detailed course description click here

    ENGL 366: American Literature/American Gothic
    Johnson

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    366MWF1-1:50 Johnson, Amanda
    For Fall 2016 detailed course description click here

    *ENGL 368: Literature & the Environment
    Woods, D.

    ENGL 377: Art & Literature
    Snow

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    377MWF1-2:20 Snow

    ENGL 381/SWGS 327: Women Writers: Contemporary Women's Poetry
    Logan

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    381MWF10-10:50 Logan, Jill T.
    For the Fall 2016 detailed course description click here

    ENGL 397: Asian American Literature & Culture
    Comer

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    397TTH10:50-12:05 Comer
    For Fall 2016 detailed course description click here

    ENGL 400 Capstone: Hemingway and Henry James
    Derrick

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    400TR9:25-10:40 Derrick
    For the Fall 2016 detailed course description click here

    ENGL 459: Capstone: The Arts in the Anthropocene
    Morton

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    459T2:30-5:30 Morton

    ENGL 471/SPAN: Chicana/o Literature
    Aranda

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    471MWF11-11:50 Aranda
    For the Fall 2016 detailed course description click here

    **ENGL 4xx: Spring 2017 Capstone: Literatures of Environmental Justice
    Comer

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    **4xx (proposed Spring '17)Spring 2017Changes may necessarily occur Comer

    Spring 2017 (Proposed/Unofficial) English Major Capstone:

    Literatures of Environmental Justice

    **ENGL 4xx: Spring 2017 Capstone: Morrison/Faulkner
    Waligora-Davis

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    **4xx (proposed Spring '17Spring 2017Changes may necessarily occur Waligora-Davis

    Spring 2017 (Proposed/Unofficial) English Major Capstone:

    Morrison/Faulkner

    ENGL 493: Directed Reading (faculty permission required)
    ENGLISH FACULTY ONLY

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    493as directedas directedn/a ENGLISH FACULTY
    A variable-credit course designed for students who want to pursue intensive semester-long study of a particular topic not included in the curriculum. Students must identify and receive the approval of an English department faculty member. Instructor and Department approval must be granted prior to registration.

    Instructor permission required.
    Special registration forms available in the English Department.

    ENGL 494: Senior Thesis Prep (Applications were due in April)
    ENGLISH FACULTY ONLY

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor

    Senior Thesis Timeline:
    The Department encourages students to identify a research or creative topic late in their junior year, seek advice from a sponsoring faculty member, and then register for ENGL 494 (Senior Thesis Preparation) in the Fall and ENGL 495 (Senior Thesis) in the Spring. Students will be evaluated by the supervising faculty at the end of the Fall semester and must receive approval to advance to ENGL 495 in the Spring. Students who do not choose, or are not approved, to advance to the second semester will receive a letter grade for ENGL 494 and terminate further work on the senior thesis.

    Read more about the senior thesis here.


    ENGL 494
    Writing and completion of a substantive research project under the supervision of a member of the English department. Prior approval of instructor and department approval must be granted prior to registration. Consult English department website for procedures and application. Instructor and department approval must be granted prior to registration. Prerequisites: ENGL 200; ENGL 300

    Instructor permission required. Applications are due April 4, 2016.

    Senior Thesis Presentations will take place on the last day of classes of the Spring 2017 semester on Rice campus. Details forthcoming.

    Spring 2016 Undergraduate

    *course is approved for "D1" (from Spring 2016 Rice Master Distribution List located on Registrar's Website)   

    Special note to our English majors and English double majors: 
    Please check "Courses Satisfying English Major Field Distribution"on our website for semester lists of our approved field courses satisfying our requirements. These courses change from semester to semester.  
      

    *ENGL 175: Global Literatures in English
    Conrad-Bracken;Henry;Sherrier

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 175 (canceled)MWF (canceled)10-10:50Canceled Conrad-Bracken
    ENGL 175TR6:30-7:45 Henry, B.
    ENGL 175MWF11-11:50 Sherrier, L.
    Click here for description of ENGL 175 (Conrad-Bracken)
    Click here for description of ENGL 175 (Henry)
    Click here for description of ENGL 175 (Sherrier)

    *ENGL 200: Critical Reading & Writing
    Regier; Houlik-Ritchey; Snow

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 200MWF10-10:50 Regier
    ENGL 200MWF11-11:50 Houlik-Ritchey
    ENGL 200TR10:50-12:05 Snow

    2015-2016 Rice Catalog Description of ENGL 200:

    *ENGL 200-CRITICAL READING AND WRITING
    Credits: 3
    Grade Mode: Standard Letter
    A course designed for and required of all prospective English majors. Emphasis is on close reading, literary interpretation, and critical writing. Attention is paid to the major genres (poetry, drama, and fiction) across a range of historical periods.

    *as of Fall 2015, ENGL 200 is approved for d1
     

    Click here for description of ENGL 200 (Regier)

    Click here for description of ENGL 200 (Michie)

    Click here for description of ENGL 200 (Snow)

    ENGL 203: Creative Writing: "Writing Place"
    Otremba

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 203TR2:30-3:45 Otremba
    Click here for description of ENGL 203

    *ENGL 210: Major British Writers, Chaucer -1800 (canceled)
    Houlik-Ritchey

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 210 (canceled 12/7/15)TR9:25-10:40 Houlik-Ritchey
    Click here for description of ENGL 210

    *ENGL 250: Masterworks of Ficiton
    Adkins, A.

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 250TR9:25-10:40 Adkins, A.
    Click here for description of ENGL 250

    *ENGL 260: Intro to the Study of Am. Literature (canceled)
    Lurie

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 260 (canceled)TR 2:30-3:45 Lurie
    Click here for description of ENGL 260

    ENGL/HURC 299: (Dis)Locating Art:Lit., Art,Music, Making Communities
    Yates-Richard, Meina

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 299/HURC 299TR1-2:20 Yates-Richard, M.
    Click here for description of ENGL and HURC 299

    ENGL 300: Practices in Literary Study
    Morton; Hennessy

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor

    Click here for description of ENGL 300 (Morton)

    Click here for description of ENGL 300 (Hennessy)

    ENGL 301: Intro to Fiction Writing
    Schimmel

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 301Monday5-8:00 Schimmel
    ENGL 301Wednesday3-6:00 Schimmel
    Click here for description of ENGL 301 (both sections taught by Ian Schimmel - Spring 2016)


    ENGL 302: Screenwriting
    Dermont

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 302Tuesday2:30-5:30 Dermont
    Click here for description of ENGL 302

    ENGL 304: Intro to Poetry Writing
    Otremba

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 304TR10:50-12:05 Otremba
    Click here for description of ENGL 304

    ENGL 307: Poetry Writing, "Poet in the Museum"
    Campana

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 307Wednesday3-6:00 Campana
    Click here for description of ENGL 307

    *ENGL 317: Arthurian Literature (crosslisted w/MDEM,SWGS)
    Houlik-Ritchey

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 317TR1-2:20 Houlik-Ritchey
    Click here for description of ENGL 317

    *ENGL 320: Shakespeare on Film
    Huston

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 320MWF2-4:00 Huston
    Click here for description of ENGL 320

    *ENGL 321: Early Shakespeare
    Skura

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 321MWF11-11:50 Skura
    Click here for description of ENGL 321

    *ENGL 338: Survey of British Romanticism
    Hargrave

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 338TR2:30-3:45 Hargrave
    Click here for description of ENGL 338

    *ENGL 342: Survey of Victorian Literature (crosslisted w/SWGS)
    Michie

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 342MWF1-1:50 Michie
    Click here for description of ENGL 342

    ENGL 356: Modernisms
    Lamos

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 356MWF10-10:50 Lamos
    Click here for description of ENGL 356

    *ENGL 357: Origins of the Postmodern
    Morris

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 357Thursday2:30-5:30 Morris
    Click here for description of ENGL 357

    *ENGL 359: Writing On/Writing Off New Orleans
    Browning

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 359MWF11-11:50 Browning
    Click here or description of ENGL 359

    *ENGL 360: American Literatue Before 1860
    Johnson, A.

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 360MWF10-10:50 Johnson, A.
    Click here for description of ENGL 360

    *ENGL 361: American Literature: 1860-1910
    Johnson, A.

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 361MWF2-2:50 Johnson, A.
    Click here for description of ENGL 361

    ENGL 369: The American West and Its Others (crosslisted w/SWGS)
    Comer

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 369TR4-5:15 Comer
    Click here for description of ENGL 369

    ENGL 371: Chicano/a Literature (crosslisted w/SPAN & SWGS)
    Aranda

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 371MWF11-11:50 Aranda
    Click here for description of ENGL 371

    ENGL 375: Film and Literature
    Snow

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 375TR1-2:20 Snow
    Click here for description of ENGL 375

    ENGL 381: Women Writers (crosslisted w/SWGS)
    Lamos

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 381MWF1-1:50 Lamos
    Click here for description of ENGL 381

    ENGL 398: Slavery in 20th Century Amer. Film & Fict. (canceled)
    Waligora-Davis

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 398 (canceled)TR10:50-12:05HRG 224 Waligora-Davis
    Click here for description of ENGL 398

    ENGL 401: Fiction Writing (ENGL 301 prerequisite, or permission)
    Dermont

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 401Wednesday6-9:00 Dermont
    Click here for description of ENGL 401

    ENGL 419: Renaissance Drama, Christopher Marlowe
    Skura

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 419 (approved capstone)Wednesday2-5:00 Skura
    Click here for description of ENGL 419

    ENGL 466: American Literature, Drama
    Morris

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 466 ( approved capstone)Tuesday2:30-5:30 Morris
    Click here for description of ENGL 466

    ENGL 493 Independent Study (faculty permission required)
    English Department Faculty only

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor

    *ENGL 493-INDEPENDENT STUDY/DIRECTED READING

    Repeatable for Credit
    Credits: 1 TO 6
    Grade Mode: Standard Letter
    A variable-credit course designed for students who want to pursue intensive semester-long study of a particular topic not included in the curriculum. Students must identify and receive the approval of an English department faculty member.
    Instructor and Department approval must be granted prior to registration.

    Instructor permission required

    Department: English

    *Special Forms are available in the English Department, Herring Hall Room 225

    ENGL 495: Senior Thesis (completion)
    English Department Faculty

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 495April 22, 2016 (Senior Thesis Presentations)4-6:30HUMA TBD

    ENGL 495-SENIOR THESIS (this course part is a continuation for those students taking ENGL 494 in Fall 2015)

    Presentations take place on the last day of classes: April 22, 2016

    Repeatable for Credit
    Credits: 3
    Grade Mode: Standard Letter
    Writing and completion of a substantive research project under the supervision of a member of the English department. Prior approval of instructor and department approval must be granted prior to registration. Consult English department website for procedures and application. Instructor and department approval must be granted prior to registration. Prerequisites: ENGL 200; ENGL 300; ENGL 493 or 494.

    Department: English

    Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 200 AND ENGL 300 AND (ENGL 493 OR ENGL 494) 

    Fall 2015 Undergraduate English Courses

    *course is approved for D1  (Fall 2015)

    Special note to our English majors and English double majors:
    Please check "Courses Satisfying English Major Field Distribution"on our website for semester lists of our approved field courses satisfying our requirements. These courses change from semester to semester.

    *ENGL 175: Global Literatures in English
    Biggs; Butz; Martini Paula

    *ENGL 200: Critical Reading & Writing
    Houlik-Ritchey; Joseph

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    200.1MWF10-10:50 Houlik-Ritchey
    200.2MWF11-11:50 Joseph, Betty
    200.3 (canceled)TTH10:50-12:05 Waligora-Davis
    Click here for description (Houlik-Ritchey)

     

    ENGL 200 is now approved for Group 1 Distribution effective Fall 2015-Spring 2016)

    ENGL 201: Introduction to Creative Writing
    Schimmel

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    201Mon/Wednesdays4-5:30WSC 146 Schimmel, Ian
    Click here for description

    *ENGL 210: Major British Writers: Chaucer - 1800
    Huston

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    210MWF10-10:50 Huston, Dennis
    Click here for description

    *ENGL 211: Major British Writers: 1800 - present
    Browning

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    211MWF11-11:50 Browning, Logan
    Click here for description

    *ENGL: 250: Masterworks of Fiction
    Canceled!

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    Course canceled

    *ENGL 260: Introduction to the Study of American Literature
    Johnson, Amanda (New!)

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    260TR10:50-12:05 TBD

    Fall 2015
    * ENGL 260 Introduction to American Literature
    Tues/Thursdays 10:50-12:05
    Instructor: Johnson, Amanda 

    This course will provide an introduction to American literatures from accounts of early European encounters with the “New World” through the early twentieth century.  The goal is to give you a framework for further investigation of American literature, history, and culture - to provide a foundation of knowledge concerning key authors, texts, literary movements, and concerns within the history of United States literature.  We will also work to develop skills in careful reading, critical thinking, analysis of literature, and writing about literature.

    * approved for d1

    *ENGL 265: Jewish American Literature and Culture
    Lurie

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    265 (canceled)TTH9:25-10:40 Lurie
    Click here for description

    *ENGL 270: Aspects of Modern Literature
    Morris

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    270TTH9:25-10:40 Morris, Wesley

    *ENGL 273: Medicine & Media
    Nelson, J.

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    273TTH + Wed.4-5:15 + Wed. 7-9:30 Films Nelson, J.

    Fall 2015
    ENGL 273 (SWGS 273)
    MEDICINE AND MEDIA 

    An interdisciplinary exploration of the role of imaging technologies in the practice of medicine, and the role of mass media in shaping our understandings of the body, health, and disease. This course examines visual media structure "ways of seeing" for physicians and for the public. Emphasis will be placed on developing media literacy skills.

    ENGL 300: Practices of Literary Study
    Roof; Morris

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    300.1TTH1-2:15 Roof, Judith
    300.2Thursdays2:30-5:30 Morris, Wesley
    Click here for description (Roof)

    ENGL 301: Introduction to Fiction
    Dermont; Schimmel

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    301.1Wednesdays2-5:00 Dermont, Amber
    301.2Tuesdays6-9 :00WSC 146 Schimmel, Ian
    Click here for description (Schimmel)

    ENGL 304: Introduction to Poetry Writing
    Otremba

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    304TTH2;30-3:45 Otremba
    Click here for description

    ENGL 306: Topics in Fiction Writing: Fairy Tales
    Dermont

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    306Tuesdays6-9:00 Dermont, Amber

    ENGL 307: Topics in Poetry Writing: Forms of Address
    Otremba

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    307Wednesdays3-6:00 Otremba, Paul
    Click here for description

    *ENGL 316: Chaucer (crosslisted, MDEM; SWGS)
    Houlik-Ritchey

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 316/MDEM316/SWGS305MWF1-1:50 Houlik-Ritchey
    Click here for description

    *ENGL 322: Late Shakespeare
    Skura

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    322TTH2:30-3:45 Skura, Meredith
    Click here for course description

    ENGL 323: Renaissance Drama
    Skura

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    323TTH9:25-10:40 Skura, Meredith

    Fall 2015
    ENGL 323 Renaissance Drama
    Instructor: Meredith Skura
    Tuesday/Thursdays 9:25-10:40

    Shakespeare wasn’t the only one writing during the Golden Age of Renaissance drama in English (c. 1585-1630).  From its beginnings in folk lore and holiday practices, to its flourishing years at the center of London life and on to its decline into violence and sensationalism, the English stage drew some of the most interesting minds into its service as playwrights.  We will read a selection of plays by Thomas Kyd, Robert Greene, Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton, John Webster, and perhaps others. 

    ENGL 326: Early Modern Lit.: Love, Death & Sex in Renaissance
    Campana

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    326TTH10:50-12:05 Campana, Joseph

    Click here for course description

     

    ENGL 328: Milton
    Snow

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    328TTH9:25-10:40 Snow, Ed
    Click here for description

    *ENGL 333: 18th-C. British Fiction
    Joseph

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    333MWF2-2:50 Joseph, Betty
    Click here for description

    *ENGL 341: Victorian Literature and Culture
    Logan

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    341TTH10:50-12:05 Logan, Thad
    Click here for description of ENGL 341

    *ENGL 346: 20th Century British Literature
    Doody

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    346MWF10-10:50 Doody, Terry
    Click here for description

    ENGL 350: 20th Cent. European Fiction: Proust
    Boyd, S.

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    350TTH1-2:20 Boyd, Sydney

    Fall 2015
    *ENGL 350 European Fiction, 20th Century: Proust
    Instructor: Sydney Boyd
    TTH 1-2:20

    Remembrance of Things Past is the #1 book that educated readers wish that they had read, according to The New York Times.  Why? Take this course and find out!

    Marcel Proust's magnum opus, written in the early years of the 20th Century, is a meditation on memory, a story of jealousy, a political and artistic treatise, and, finally, an exposure of "perversion."  Alain de Botton's bestseller, entitled How Proust Can Save Your Life, may be silly, but its title is true.

    We will read Remembrance of Things Past in its entirety, in translation. Our focus will be on the many ways that the novel has been interpreted and, especially, on how it has shaped Twentieth-Century thought, from Henri Bergson to Eve Kosofsky Sedgwich, and continues to do so in ours.

    We will explore the novbel from many angles, including Proust's interest in food.

    *This course is a rare opportunity to read one of the most important works of western literature. 

    ENGL 354: Queer Literary Cultures: FROM WILDE TO WINTERSON
    Fax

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    354/SWGS364Mondays2-5:00 Fax, Joanna

    Fall 2015
    ENGL 354: Queer Literary Cultures, FROM WILDE TO WINTERSON      NEW TOPIC!

    Instructor: Joanna Fax
    Monday 2-5:00 pm

    Oscar Wilde's defense of "the love that dare not speak its name" in his 1895 trial for gross indecency marked the beginning of the modern publi discourse of same-sex love. Twentieth-century literature was, to a significant degree, formed and "deformed" (Sedgwick's term) by the effort not to talk about it.

    We will look at major literary works of this period with our ears attuned to silences and murmurings about gender and sexual queerness, from Wilde, Forster, and Woolf to Kureishi, and Winterson.

    *ENGL 360: Early American Literature Before 1860
    Derrick

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    360MWF11-11:50 Derrick, Scott
    Click here for description

    *ENGL 362: Survey of American Fiction: 1910-1950
    Doody

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    362MWF1-1:50 Doody, Terry
    Click here for description

    ENGL 366: American Literature: Utopia and 19th C. America
    Johnson, Amanda (New!)

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    366TR4-5:15 Johnson, Amanda

    Fall 2015
    ENGL 366: American Literature "Utopia in Nineteenth-Century America"    
    NEW TOPIC, NEW INSTRUCTOR
    Instructor: Amanda Johnson
    Tuesday & Thursdays 4-5:15 

    Eutopia, in Greek, means “good place,” but its homophone utopia means “no place.” This pun ironizes any serious belief in the possibility of a perfect human society, and this class will explore how American literature throughout the nineteenth century wrestles with America as a “good place” that might not actually exist. This conception of America starts early on, with European explorers setting out to find Eden and El Dorado somewhere in the New World, and religious settlers celebrating their newfound colony as a future Zion. Utopianism, then, could be millennial, and even in the 1800s, American authors find themselves struggling with this apocalyptic vision. When practiced in earnest, utopianism had complex material consequences for people and the environment, as utopian thinking drove progressive social movements, but also underwrote colonialist projects such as slavery and westward Manifest Destiny. Serious debates over what constituted the ideal society also structured moments of national founding, or re-founding, as one might consider the era of Reconstruction. Perhaps as a result, literary representations of utopia are often satirical, and provide commentary on contemporary social ills. Utopias, then, often contain within themselves a “bad place” or dystopia that ultimately disrupts the social fantasy. In addition to reading texts that allude to historical examples of American utopianism, this class will also explore how the concept of utopia, a category that announces its own non-existence, can help us understand the philosophical nature of fiction as a type of narrative that is simultaneously “real” and counterfactual. 

    ENGL 377: Art & Literature
    Snow

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    377TTH1-2:20HRG 224 Snow, Ed
    Click here for description

    ENGL 382: Fem. Lit. Theory: Reading Bodies, Imaginary and Otherwise
    Hennessy

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 382/SWGS380TTH10:50-12:05 Hennessy
    Click here for description

    ENGL 392: Contemporary Poetry
    Logan

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    392TTH4-5:15 Logan, Thad
    Click here for description of ENGL 392

    ENGL 393: Black Manhattan
    Canceled!

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    393TTH2:30-3:45 Waligora-Davis, Nicole
    Course canceled

    ENGL 419: Othello & King Lear
    Huston

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    419MWF2-4:00 Huston

    Capstone course

    ENGL 432: Clarissa
    Ellenzweig

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    432/SWGS472TTH1-2:15 Ellenzweig, Sarah
    Click here for description

    ENGL 471: Chicana/o Literature
    Aranda

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    471/SPAN471MWF11-11:50 Aranda, Jose
    Click here for description

    ENGL 493: Directed Reading
    ENGLISH FACULTY

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    493as directedas directedn/a Faculty
    A variable-credit course designed for students who want to pursue intensive semester-long study of a particular topic not included in the curriculum. Students must identify and receive the approval of an English department faculty member. Instructor and Department approval must be granted prior to registration.

    Instructor permission required.
    Special registration forms available in the English Department.

    ENGL 494: Senior Thesis Prep
    ENGLISH FACULTY

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    494as directedas directed Faculty

    Senior Thesis Timeline:
    The Department encourages students to identify a research or creative topic late in their junior year, seek advice from a sponsoring faculty member, and then register for ENGL 494 (Senior Thesis Preparation) in the Fall and ENGL 495 (Senior Thesis) in the Spring. Students will be evaluated by the supervising faculty at the end of the Fall semester and must receive approval to advance to ENGL 495 in the Spring. Students who do not choose, or are not approved, to advance to the second semester will receive a letter grade for ENGL 494 and terminate further work on the senior thesis.

    Read more about the senior thesis here.

    ENGL 494 
    Writing and completion of a substantive research project under the supervision of a member of the English department. Prior approval of instructor and department approval must be granted prior to registration. Consult English department website for procedures and application. Instructor and department approval must be granted prior to registration. Prerequisites: ENGL 200; ENGL 300


    Instructor permission required. Applications are due April 13, 2015.

    Senior Thesis Presentations will take place on the last day of classes of the Spring 2016 semester on Rice campus. Details forthcoming.

    ENGL 495: Senior Thesis
    ENGLISH FACULTY

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    495as directedas directed Faculty

    Senior Thesis Timeline:
    The Department encourages students to identify a research or creative topic late in their junior year, seek advice from a sponsoring faculty member, and then register for ENGL 494 (Senior Thesis Preparation) in the Fall and ENGL 495 (Senior Thesis) in the Spring. Students will be evaluated by the supervising faculty at the end of the Fall semester and must receive approval to advance to ENGL 495 in the Spring. Students who do not choose, or are not approved, to advance to the second semester will receive a letter grade for ENGL 494 and terminate further work on the senior thesis.

    Read more about the senior thesis here.

    ENGL 495:
    Writing and completion of a substantive research project under the supervision of a member of the English department. Prior approval of instructor and department approval must be granted prior to registration. Consult English department website for procedures and application. Instructor and department approval must be granted prior to registration. Prerequisites: ENGL 200; ENGL 300; ENGL 493 or 494.

    Instructor permission required. Applications are due April 13, 2015.

    Senior Thesis Presentations will take place on the last day of classes of the Spring 2016 semester on Rice campus. Details forthcoming.

    Spring 2015 Undergraduate

    Wednesday, Oct. 29: English Preregistration Lunch Session (12:00)
    Additional Session (Coffee & Cupcakes) (4:00) All welcome!
    Monday, Nov. 3: ESTHER course planner opens for Spring 2015 registration
    Sunday, Nov.16: ESTHER course planner closes at 11:59 pm
    Monday, Nov. 17: Spring 2015 registration begins for grads & 5th year students at 5pm
    Wednesday, Nov. 19: Spring 2015 ADD/DROP begins for undergrads at 7am
    Friday, Nov. 21: Last day to register for Spring 2015 by 5 pm without a late registration fee
    *course is approved for D1 Fall 2014-Spring 2015

    COLL 192: The Wire: Television as Text, City as Character (Wiess)
    Bullard, Maddy (Wiess '15, English Major)

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    COLL 192Wednesdays7-8:00 pm Bullard, Maddy (ENGL Major)

    Reading The Wire: Television as Text and City as Character
    Wiess College Course
    Spring 2015
    Instructor: Maddy Bullard (Wiess ’15 and English Major)
    Wednesdays, 7-8pm 

    This course will focus on issues of urban decay, crime, race, gender, and institutional dysfunction in HBO’s The Wire. The critically acclaimed series explores drug trade, the urban poor, politics, education and the media, with 1990s Baltimore as the backdrop. The Wire, and creator David Simon, have high expectations of viewers, namely that they remain seriously engaged with each of the series’ five seasons, and think critically about the issues each episode examines. During this course you will develop close reading strategies, as well as form evidence-based arguments during class discussions. The course will be taught primarily from an English literature standpoint, although we will engage with many academic perspectives. The course will be offered for one credit on a P/F basis in Spring 2015, Wednesdays from 7-8 pm. Course number TBD. Email Maddy at mcb8@rice.edu for more information. 

    ENGL 175: Global Literatures in English*
    Beroiza, Ellis-Etchison, Gauthereau (3 sections offered Spring 2015)

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    175.1MWF9-9:50 Beroiza
    175.2TR10:50-12:05 Ellis-Etchison
    175.3MWF1-1:50 Gauthereau

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 175 (general description for all sections)
    Global Literatures in English
    Instructors: Beroiza; Ellis-Etchison; Gauthereau 

    This very popular Rice course offers an introduction to global literary studies. Its goal is to introduce you to a range of influential literatures, to enhance your analytic skills of close reading and textual comparison, and to improve your expository writing ability. The subject of the course is twentieth-century English-language modernism and its successors, postmodernism and postcolonialism. The course attends to the effects of each tradition on its successors, and, reciprocally, the effect of subsequent traditions on our understanding of the implications and deficiencies of previous movements.  

    Part I, "The Shock of the New," focuses on the first decades of the twentieth century, when a powerful desire for change swept over writers and artists in Europe (including Western Russia) and the United States. Under this influence, the art that was produced was self-consciously "modern," conceived in reaction to traditional subjects and conventional styles of representation.  

    Part II, "The West and the Rest," addresses classic literary texts from Great Britain and the United States alongside what may be called postcolonial responses—literary texts by writers from other traditions that respond to Western "modernism."  

    Part III, "Mapping the Postmodern," concludes the course by charting "postmodernism" as a cultural response to World War II, global decolonization, and the deindustrialization of the economic North. The texts illustrate significant fault lines or points of difference in critical debates about postmodern literature and its styles, strategies, and political effects. This final section will provide you with an introductory critical vocabulary and set of fictional experiences about one of the most influential and challenging cultural constructions in our contemporary world. 

    ENGL 200: Critical Reading and Writing
    Comer, Ellenzweig, Skura (3 sections offered Spring 2015)

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    200.1TTH4-5:15 Comer
    200.2MWF1-1:50 Ellenzweig
    200.3TTH9:25-10:40 Skura

    A course designed for and required of all prospective English majors. Emphasis is on close reading, literary interpretation, and critical writing. Attention is paid to the major genres (poetry, drama, and fiction) across a range of historical periods.

    Click here for a more detailed description of ENGL 200.1

    Click here for a more detailed description of ENGL 200.2

    Click here for a more detailed description of ENGL 200.3

    ENGL 210: Major British Writers: Chaucer-1800*
    Browning

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    210MWF11-11:50 Browning

    A survey of representative British authors of the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the 18th century for both majors and non-majors. 

    Spring 2015
    ENGL  210 
    Major British: Chaucer - 1800
    MWF 11-11:50
    Instructor: Logan Browning 

    We will read from a variety of genres (lyric and epic poetry, satire, tragedy and comedy, short fiction, essays, travel narrative) and range chronologically from Beowulf (translated by Seamus Heaney), to Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night and King Lear, to the prose of the eighteenth century’s Oprah, Dr. Samuel Johnson, and to the comic Beggar’s Opera by John Gay, concluding with William Hogarth’s visual narrative progress, Marriage a la Mode.  Our goal will be to understand more clearly what others have thought valuable in each text and why, with the goal of understanding more fully what evaluative criteria each of us applies to his or her own reading. We will also explore the various ways in which the relations among artist, audience, medium, and historical context manifest themselves in the texts under consideration, and the various strategies that authors have used to direct or control responses to their texts. 

    Most of the assignments will come from the new 9th edition of the Norton Anthology of English Literature, volume 1A,B, and C. 

    Requirements: class attendance and participation, eight short papers (one to two pages each), and a take-home midterm and final examination. 

    ENGL 222: World & South Asia*
    Joseph

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    222TR9:25-10:40 Joseph

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 222/ASIA 222: The World and South Asia*
    Tues/Thurs. 9:25-10:40
    Instructor: Prof. Betty Joseph 

    Overview
    Some of the most exciting fiction in the English language has come out of South Asia. Over the last three decades, writers from India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh have made a splash on the international scene with award-winning and bestselling works. In this course, we will read novels, short stories, essays and plays--produced from within the Indian subcontinent as well as from the West. While most works were originally written in English, the course will also include a few classic 20th-century works in translation (Tagore, Manto, Chughtai, Faiz, Dhasal). Through them, we will discuss key features of the political and social upheavals of the region: its experience of British colonialism, nationalism, the Partition, class and caste politics, religion and regionalism, development and underdevelopment, globalization as well as the dynamics of the family, gender relations, sexual identities and cultural belonging. For historical background and contexts we will also use Sugata Bose and Ayesha Jalal’s, Modern South Asia: History, Culture, Political Economy and other supplemental readings

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    --Engage thoughtfully with multicultural traditions
    --Develop close reading, critical thinking, and analytic skills
    --Develop genre-specific knowledge
    --Build historical, interdisciplinary, or contextual knowledge

    Required Texts:
    Sugata Bose and Ayesha Jalal, Modern South Asia: History, Culture, Political Economy
    Rabindranath Tagore, Home and the World
    Bapsi Sidhwa, Cracking India
    Upamanyu Chatterjee, English, August
    Manjula Padmanabhan, Harvest
    Mohsin Hamid, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia
    Zia Haider Rahman, In the Light of What We Know: A Novel

    Readings will also include several short stories, poetry and prose (available on Owlspace).

    Evaluation
    1 five-page paper with revision (15%); Mid-term (15%); Final exam (30%);Participation (20%); 5 one-page response papers (20%).

    *This course is approved for D1 distribution.
    *This course fulfills the diversity (non-canonical) requirement for the English major.

    ENGL 250: Masterworks of Fiction*
    Harvey

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    250MWF10-10:50 Harvey

    Spring 2015 
    ENGL 250 Masterworks of Fiction 
    Instructor: Maggie Harvey 

    As the novel progressed from early nineteenth century to twentieth century, one of the most ubiquitous and enduring plot structures was the courtship plot. Girl meets boy or boy(s) and complications and barriers must be overcome before there is comic closure in the form of the marriage of the best possible couple. As this plot developed, however, authors adapted this formula for their own purposes, highlighting and foregrounding class concerns, gender issues, political debates, and global battles for cultural and sovereign dominance. How does the relationship, courtship, and marriage triad that is an essential part of the novel form look or act differently when confronted with these concerns? This course will ask and hopefully answer questions about the courtship plot and novel as they both progress into the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. 

    This course is designed to introduce first and second year students to the intellectual, historical, and aesthetic importance of the novelistic tradition. The readings for this course will include masterworks by Austen, Trollope, Broughton, Forster, and West .The reading pace for this discussion-based course will be brisk but rewarding, supplemented with key scholarly texts and films. Students will also be introduced to issues in secondary research and a portion of class time will be devoted to developing and improving writing skills.  

    Required Texts: 
    Jane Austen Pride and Prejudice 
    Anthony Trollope The Small House at Allington 
    Rhoda Broughton Cometh up As a Flower 
    E. M. Forster A Passage to India 
    Rebecca West The Return of the Soldier 

    ENGL 255: The Idea of Shakespeare, Shakespeare's Kings*
    Campana

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    255TR9:25-10:40 Campana

    Spring 2015
    *ENGL 255: The Idea of Shakespeare "Shakespeare’s Kings"
    Instructor: Joseph Campana
    Tues/Thurs. 9:25-10:40  

    “The Idea of Shakespeare” is designed to introduce non-majors and potential English majors to the works of Shakespeare. This year’s course will be organized around “Shakespeare’s Kings.” Shakespeare was a great dramatist of kingship. Whether in history plays, written about events in England’s past or in tragedies, which were so often about kingdoms in crisis, or even in his Roman plays, which consider ancient forms of government other than monarchy, Shakespeare’s works are consistently concerned with political rule. What is power—how is it gained and how is it held? What guarantees the legitimacy of rule? What makes a good ruler? Should a ruler be merciful or manipulative, violent or generous? Is it possible to reconcile the idea of an absolute sovereign with the practicalities of rule? Are the trappings of sovereignty merely ornamental or is there power in ceremony? Is it possible to reconcile the masculine language of kingship with female rule? What about child kings? How should the children of princes be treated and educated to ensure stability? What about elderly kings, mad kings, and bad kings? This course will sample, widely, Shakespeare’s works with these questions about kings and kingship in mind, including a number of the following: King Lear, Macbeth, Hamlet, Richard II, Henry IV, Henry V , Richard III, Julius Caesar, Titus Andronicus, Measure for Measure , Pericles, Winter’s Tale.

    ENGL 260: Intro to the Study of American Literature*
    Hennessy, Seglie (2 sections offered Spring 2015)

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    260.1TR2:30-3:45 Hennessy
    260.2MWF3-3:50 Seglie

    ENGL 260.1 Professor Rosemary Hennessy 
    Introduction to American Literature: Spectral America 
    Spring 2015   T-TH 2:30-3:45
    Fulfills D-1 requirement 

    What does it mean to read American literature as haunted? What sorts of specters range across genres and traditions, and what marks them as specific to the national imagination that informs literary culture in the United States?  

    This course introduces students to the literature of the United States through a focus on its spectral aspects. We will employ several strategies for reading between the lines where the anxieties of an era surface, symptoms of unresolved social ills circulate, and un-mourned losses haunt national aspirations. While the course will follow a loose chronology ranging from the mid-nineteenth century through the early twenty-first, it is also an introduction to critical reading against the linear logic of progress and a chance to practice what that means.   

    As we collect evidence of encrypted histories, we will pay close attention to narrative and poetic forms. We will track unsettling suspect narrators and loaded metaphors, ponder the effects of structural and temporal disruptions, and listen for encrypted dialogues with the dead. We will read for secrets and hidden histories that leave their imprint in a text, sometimes only as a trace, and for a critical cultural tradition that also has made visible the dis-ease and alternative possibilities that haunt national myths and accepted notions of identity, property, and propriety.  

    ENGL 260.2  Instructor: AnaMarie Seglie
    Introduction to American Literature
    Spring 2015   MWF 3-3:50 
    Fulfills D-1 requirement
     

    Where is America? U.S. authors offer a variety of answers: New England, the South, the frontier, the wilderness, on the battlefield, in the home, etc. This course offers an introduction to the study of American literature by considering the role of space, place, and geography in U.S. texts from the late eighteenth century through the early twentieth century. We will study America’s various spaces and how they have been shaped by debates surrounding religion, race, gender, and class.   

    Examining how writers of all types locate “America,” we will analyze a variety of literary forms, including the novel, short story, essay, and poetry. In studying these forms, this course will introduce students to key literary movements as well as authors ranging from Washington Irving to Emily Dickinson to Langston Hughes and F. Scott Fitzgerald. We will employ course texts to develop critical reading and writing skills through short essays and blog posts. As a seminar style course, classes will be primarily discussion-based, but they will also include time to brainstorm and workshop papers. 

    *This course fulfills a Distribution 1 (D1) requirement* For more information, feel free to email ats3@rice.edu   

    ENGL 270: Aspects of Modern Literature*
    Richardson

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    270MWF9-9:50 Richardson

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 270 Aspects of Modern Literature: The Roaring Twenties*
    Instructor: Laura Richardson  

    Jazz. Flappers. Speakeasies. Art Deco. The Harlem Renaissance. Widespread economic prosperity. The advent of the golden age of cinema. If you could time travel to any decade, you couldn’t do better than the 1920s. In the aftermath of World War II, amid the aesthetic revolution of modernism inaugurated in the teens, the literature and culture of the Europe and the U.S. erupted into frenzied expression. New forms of art were breaking traditional modes of representation, experimenting with fragmentation, new structures and styles of narration, nonlinear temporalities, and poetic form. Historically, the success of women’s suffrage in 1919 and the flourishing of the Harlem Renaissance signaled new opportunities for women and African Americans. The ’20s were about possibility, newness, change, and energy

    Ironically, however, much of the literature to emerge from this time period reflects a different ethos. Iconic ’20s novels like The Great Gatsby, Mrs. Dalloway, and The Sun Also Rises present war-torn characters/communities struggling with the loss of shared cultural values and the inability to locate moral and aesthetic meaning in traditional structures. This course investigates this ’20s dialectic, questioning the relationships between the decade’s jubilancy, celebration, tumult, pessimism, and crash. The course is divided into sections that cover responses to WWI; high modernism’s poetry and novels; the Harlem Renaissance; prohibition, jazz, and dance; and popular comedic writing. Highlights include special screenings of Metropolis and Midnight in Paris, lessons on the Charleston and the Lindy Hop (from dance instructors at the Rice gym), and a Roaring Twenties-themed costume party, complete with jazz, mocktails, and dancing.  

    d1 approved 2014-2015 

    ENGL 272: Literature and Medicine*
    Goode, A.

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    272TR4-5:15 Goode, A.

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 272 Literature and Medicine
    Instructor: Goode, Abby
    Tues/Thurs. 4-5:15 

    This course offers students an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of literature and medicine.  Through the study of novels, poems, plays, films, and non-fiction works—as well as through visits with local medical ethicists and practicing physicians—it will explore what literature can teach us about a number of complex medical topics.  The goal is that, by the end of the course, students will have gained an appreciation for how literature and other non-scientific modes of thought can contribute to the study and practice of medicine.  Assignments will include a number of short essays and one final project.  For more information, including a complete reading list and a detailed description of assignments, please feel free to contact me at aak@rice.edu.  

    This course has been approved for Distribution Group I (d1) credit for Fall 2014-Spring 2015

    ENGL 300: Practices of Literary Study
    Morton, Lurie (2 sections offered Spring 2015)

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    300.1TR1-2:20 Morton, T.
    300.2TR2:30-3:50 Lurie

    A course that identifies and explores key concepts of recent critical writing. Students read short texts of contemporary theory and discuss the relation between theory and literature. Required for English majors.

    Click here for a more detailed description of ENGL 300.1 

    Click here for a more detailed description of ENGL 300.2

    ENGL 301: Intro to Fiction Writing
    Schimmel (2 sections offered Spring 2015)

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    301.1Mondays6-9:00 Schimmel
    301.2Wednesdays3-6:00 Schimmel
    Spring 2015 (two sections will be offered)
    ENGL 301.1 Introduction to Fiction Writing Mondays 6-9:00
    ENGL 301.2 Introduction to Fiction Writing Wednesdays 3-6:00
    (Limited enrollment, no waitlist)
    Instructor: Schimmel, Ian

    This class will devote itself to the study of fiction writing, specifically the short story form. By looking to other writers as models, you will learn how to craft your own imaginative, well-written narratives. In many ways, this class will operate much like an artists’ studio. You will practice the art of fiction as much as you will study it. You will be throwing paint on the canvass, making mistakes, and getting messy. You will work with different literary techniques and styles to explore and hone your own craft. This growth will come about through experimentation and sharing of your personal work, and by studying and reflecting on the work of masters as well as that of your peers’.Through this course you will become a more active and involved reader, a more careful and skilled writer, and ultimately, a clearer participant in your own life. You will enhance your ability to criticize your own work and understand how to refine your art to better meet the demands of your peers, and yourself. You will learn how to balance the acts of imagination necessary for generating ideas with the formal discipline needed to realize your artistic ambitions. The ultimate goal of this course is for you to write as deeply and thoughtfully and imaginatively as you can.

    ENGL 302: Screenwriting
    Dermont

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    302Tuesday2:30-5:30 Dermont

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 302 Intro to Screenwriting
    (limited enrollment, no wait list)
    Tuesdays 2:30-5:30
    Professor Amber Dermont

    This course will introduce students to the art and craft of screenwriting through a focused study of terminology, dramatic structure and cinematic technique. Assignments will include weekly viewing of films and readings of original/adapted screenplays and source materials. Through weekly writing assignments, students will compose their own pitches, treatments, outlines and will draft the first act of a full-length screenplay. Films viewed may include: Casablanca, Annie Hall, Pulp Fiction, Election, Blade Runner, Jaws, Fresh, The Squid and The Whale, The Fantastic Mr. Fox, The Talented Mr. Ripley , Memento, Good Fellas, Gladiator, The Town and No Country for Old Men.

    ENGL 303: Playwriting
    Roof

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    303TR1-2:20 Roof

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 303 Playwriting
    Tues/Thurs. 1-2:20 
    Instructor: Roof, Judith 

    “Right from the jump, ask yourself: “Why does this thing I’m writing have to be a play?”  The words “why,” “have” and “play” are key.  If you don’t have an answer then get out of town.  No joke.  The last thing American theatre needs is another lame play.”                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          - Suzan-Lori Parks 

    In this course you will write, workshop, rewrite, stage, rewrite, and perform a one-act play. You will also read, parse, analyze, and work through existing play texts. 

    ENGL 304: Introduction to Poetry Writing
    Otremba

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    304TR4-5:15 Otremba

    An introduction to poetry writing through the study of contemporary poets and the writing of poems. The class will pay extensive attention to such elements of poetry as imagery, figurative language, tone, syntax, and form in order to create a vocabulary for students to discuss their own poems. Students' poems will be critiqued by the class in a workshop setting. 

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 304 Introduction to Poetry Writing
    Instructor: Otremba, Paul 

    This course is dedicated to the study and composition of contemporary poetry. Over the semester, you will be introduced to the fundamentals for creating poetry, and we will take a contextual and historical approach to understanding how contemporary poets now employ them. We will do this by first reading example poems and analyzing key craft elements, such as image, diction, figurative language, lineation, and conventional forms. Then, you will be asked to complete exercises and produce your own poems, some of which will be workshopped by the class.  

    ENGL 320: Shakespeare on Film*
    Huston

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    320MWF2-4:00 Huston

    A course that examines both the text of selected Shakespearean plays and films based on them, focusing on the difference between film and drama.

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 320 (Permission of instructor only-use special registration form only)
    Shakespeare on Film (MWF 2-4:00)
    Instructor: Huston, Dennis

    Because the speed at which we cover material in this class is partly a function of how class discussion proceeds. I do not know for sure how many plays and films we will study, but at present I plan to study the following works:

    Richard III (McKellen film)
    Twelfth Night (Nunn film)
    Henry V (the Branagh film
    As You Like It (ACTER production)
    The Merchant of Venice (Radford film)
    Hamlet (Zeffirelli film)
    A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Hoffman film)
    Coriolanus (Fiennes film)
    I also hope to study one of the following plays and films if we have time:
    Much Ado About Nothing (Branagh film)
    Macbeth (Polanski film)

    Whatever plays and films we will study in this course, however, I plan to teach each play as a text (and a script) first, and then to study the films of these plays in an effort to understand the choices the film makers have made in adapting Shakespeare’s play to the screen. In this course, then, we will be concerned with studying both Shakespeare’s plays and what happens to those play in the hands of a creative film-maker.

    Students will be expected to write three essays in the class and, in addition, to keep a journal of each day’s reading or viewing assignment. These journals are mandatory and will be collected in class without prior warning. Though these journals will not receive specific grades, they matter, and students who do not keep them up to date will have to drop the course. I also expect students to attend class regularly and to participate actively in class discussions. Grades in this course will be based on quality (and improvement) of written work. Some attention will also be paid to the quality of a student’s participation in class discussions.

    ENGL 321: Early Shakespeare*
    Skura

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    321TR2:30-3:45 Skura

    An examination of representative early Shakespearean plays, including tragedies, comedies, and histories. Plays vary from year to year.

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 321 Early Shakespeare
    Instructor: Meredith Skura
    Tues/Thursday 2:30-3:34

    Elizabethan and Jacobean England produced the greatest plays in English—perhaps in any language—and nurtured a theater more closely intergrated into the life of its society than any we have known since. How did this happen? Why? What effect did it have? With these questions in mind, we will read a selection of Shakespeare’s earlier work (1590-1599), following his development in the period’s most successful playwright.

    Objectives:

    1. To learn about the plays we read in class and master each text’s details
    2. To learn how to read/watch other plays from the period: what to look for, how to think about what you find.
    3. To learn about Shakespeare and the relationship among his plays
    4. To learn about early modern theatrical conditions and why they matter
    5. To learn about Shakespeare’s social, cultural, economic and political context in relation to the plays
    6. To learn about modern performance and interpretive possibilities

    ENGL 330: Origins of the English Novel*
    Ellenzweig

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    330MWF11-11:50 Ellenzweig

    Spring 2015
    Sarah Ellenzweig
    ENGL 330:  Origins of the English Novel
    MWF:  11-11:50 am

    The emergence of the novel is one of the great watersheds in literary history but one that we tend today to take for granted.  We all know that the novel – generally speaking- is the predominant form of literary expression (over poetry and drama) and has been for a long time, yet this has not always been the case.  In fact, we can put a date on when it happened: sometime in the early decades of the 18th century.  Our class will read a selection from the first novels of the 18th century with the goal of understanding the conditions out of which this new genre was born.  We will examine questions of literary form and narrative theory but also the “extra-literary” contexts within which the literary unfolds: culture; philosophy; politics; and religion, among others.

    Authors will include a mix of canonical and lesser known writers:  most importantly, Defoe; Swift; Behn; Haywood; Richardson; and Fielding. 

     

    ENGL 338: Survey of British Romanticism*
    Mulligan

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    338MWF10-10:50 Mulligan

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 338 Survey of British Romanticism 
    MWF 10-10:50
    Instructor: Mulligan, John       

    This course surveys British Romantic culture, with an awareness of its relevance to contemporary life. Our cultural inheritances from the Romantics include: the image of the author as a creative genius, the belief that words are politically powerful but unpredictable things, and the idea that literature is potentially the highest form of philosophy. The period also sees complex historical movements meaningful to our own time: political revolution is followed closely by counterrevolution, massive industrial development alongside a fascination with wild, natural spaces, and imperial expansionism alongside a robust anti-slavery movement. The course will examine the representational strategies used by British Romantic authors in order to address these large-scale historical questions. 

    Students will be introduced to both canonical and non-canonical poets, playwrights, and novelists, including William Blake, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Jane Austen, Olaudah Equiano, Anna Laetitia Barbauld, Charlotte Smith, Felicia Hemans, Henry Mackenzie, Richard Payne Knight, and Dorothy and William Wordsworth. Attention will also be given to the critical essayists and lecturers Mary Wollstonecraft, William Godwin, William Hazlitt, Edmund Burke, Joseph Priestley, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Thomas De Quincey. Additional, contextualizing matter will include selections from Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, Friedrich Schlegel, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, John Wesley, Humphrey Davy, and Edward Gibbon, as well as the artwork of Reynolds, Katherine Charteris Grey, John and Margaret Herschel, Maria Graham, Giovanni Piranesi, Joseph Farington, Henry Fuseli, and J. M. W. Turner. By the end of the course, students will be able to give a standard account of British Romanticism as a distinct historical movement, and to complicate this periodization with reference to its eighteenth-century precedents and its broad influence on nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature and criticism. 

    *This course is approved for d1 distribution and approved for English dept. non-canonical requirement 

    ENGL 342: 19th Century Victorian Novel *
    Reeder

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    342MWF1-1:50 Reeder

    A survey of the many genres of the nineteenth-century novel, this course will try to come to terms with some of the insistent questions posed by and through the fiction of the period. Cross-list: SWGS 372.

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 342/SWGS 342 Victorian Fiction
    MWF 1-1:50
    Instructor: Dr. Jessie Reeder

    What sorts of images does the Victorian era call to mind? The age most often represented in corsets, fox hunting, and aristocratic romance in fact had quite a dark side, from devilish figures like Dracula and Mr. Hyde to murderers, thieves, ghosts, and exiles. Some of our most enduring images of monstrosity come from the minds of nineteenth-century writers. In this seminar we’ll explore what made Victorians so interested in the terrifying, the creepy, and the evil. These tales were designed to thrill the reader, but they also provide complicated insight into Victorian values. By questioning what made something or someone a monster or an outsider, our texts engage with some of the most pressing questions of their century. Evolutionary theory, scientific advancements, the progress narrative, gender spheres, racial hierarchies, and the colonial frontier all shaped the way people conceptualized the category of the human. The novels and stories in this class will help show what it meant to be human in the nineteenth century, and, perhaps, what it means to us today.

    ENGL 343: Jane Austen's Worlds
    Michie

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    343TR10:50-12:05 Michie

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 343 JANE AUSTEN’S WORLDS
    Instructor: Helena Michie   michie@rice.edu

    This course will try to come to terms with Jane Austen as author and as icon. We will read all of her fiction including examples of the strange little stories she produced as a child, and will work with her letters and her biography. This will also be something of a Jane Austen Film Festival: we will look carefully and critically at some recent film and television adaptations of her novels. We will be reading Austen's work in two historical contexts: Regency England, which provides a rich context for the political, social, sexual, and formal elements of her work, and the contemporary United States, where she was voted by People one of the Twenty-five Most Intriguing People of 1995. The course will also examine some of the concepts that inevitably arise when dealing with a much beloved and adapted author, including the death of the author, biography and hagiography, historicism, readership and reception, and theories of adaptation itself.

    Requirements: Two papers and a (perhaps group) presentation.

    Texts by Jane Austen:
    Sense and Sensibility 
    Pride and Prejudice 
    Northanger Abbey 
    Mansfield Park 
    Emma 
    Persuasion 
    Sanditon 
    Catharine and Other Stories 

    Films and Adaptations:
    Pride and Prejudice (A&E Miniseries, 1996)
    Sense and Sensibility (Ang Lee, 1995)
    Mansfield Park (Patricia Rozema,1999)
    Emma (Douglas McGrath, 1996); Jane Austen’s Emma (Diarmuid Lawrence, 1997)
    Persuasion (Robert Michell,1995)
    Clueless (Amy Heckerling,1995)
    Bridget Jones’s Diary (Sharon Maguire, 2001)
    Bride and Prejudice (Gurinder Chadha, 2004)
    Pride and Prejudice (Joe Wright, 2005)

    ENGL 351: The City in Literature
    Doody

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    351MWF10-10:50 Doody

    SPRING 2015
    ENGL 351 THE CITY IN LITERATURE
    MWF 10-10:50
    INSTRUCTOR: DOODY

    For the first time in history, more than half the earth’s population lives in cities, which suggests that the city is not merely a place, nor one human institution among others. We can think of it as the most comprehensive of our artifacts and think of its culture as a history of human choice. As the modern city was realizing itself in the nineteenth century, the novel was developing into the principal way we have had of understanding ourselves, our individuality and consciousness, and the ways in which the city has affected this evolution. The novel, in turn, affected the poetry that was its contemporary “competition.” Dickens, Zola, and Virginia Woolf , and the poets Baudelaire, Whitman, and T. S. Eliot will be among the writers we will read, in the context of historians and theorists such as Lewis Mumford, Jane Jacobs, Georg Simmel, and Michel de Certeau. And always in mind will be the question, is Rice a city? If so, what kind?

    ENGL 356: Modernisms (Canceled)
    Lamos

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    356 (canceled)TR4-5:15 Lamos

     

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 356: MODERNISMS     Canceled, will be offered another semester!  
    Instructor: PROF. LAMOS

    This course looks at the literature and culture of early 20th-Century Modernism.  While focusing upon Anglo-American literature, we will also address French and German writers and artists in order to get a full picture of the range of modernist movements in music, painting, cinema, and other sister arts as well as literature.  One aim of this course is to examine literary modernism in the context of modernity—the phenomena of everyday life as it was transformed materially (via technologies of communication, transportation, and mass media) and socially (e.g., gender and sexual practices). 

    To accomplish these goals, we will use Lawrence Rainey’s anthology, Modernisms, and read fiction, poetry, and plays by the following authors:  T. S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, William Faulkner, Djuna Barnes, James Joyce, Franz Kafka, Colette, and Samuel Beckett. 

    You will be asked to give a presentation in class and to write a weekly blog as well as a term paper. 

    ENGL 357: Origins of the Postmodern*
    Morris

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    357Thursday2:30-5:30 Morris

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 357: ORIGIN OF THE POSTMODERN
    Thursdays 2:30 – 5:30
    Instructor: Wesley Morris 

    The postmodern is less a period than a concept, less a concept than a purposeful misreading of modernism, and less a misreading of modernism than a random series of expressive acts.  From certain entertaining items embedded in this random series of expressive acts, we will uncover a few misreadings of modernism, some interesting aspects of a postmodern concept, and a rough estimate of a postmodern period, all of which will lead us to an adequate, if incomplete, understanding of postmodernism.  The entertaining items include, but are not limited to, a fairy tale (The Three Pigs), two theatrical pieces (Waiting for Godot and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead), music (Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band and other 60s pop music), a postmodern essay on a surrealist artist (This is Not a Pipe), three novels (The Crying of Lot 49, Snow White, and Mao II), and four movies (Rebel Without a Cause,  Blow-Up, Blow Out, and Blade Runner).  

    ENGL 360: American Literature Before 1860*
    Gniadek

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    360MWF10-10:50 Gnaidek
    A course that focuses careful attention on complete reading on a number of the most significant traditionally valued texts of the "American Renaissance." This course will fulfill the English major pre-1800 requirement!

    ENGL 361: American Literature from 1860-1910*
    Derrick

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    361TR9:25-10:40 Derrick

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 361: American Literature  1860-1910*
    Tues/Thurs. 9:25-10:40
    Instructor: Scott Derrick

    After the cataclysm of the Civil War, and in part because of it, US culture enters the modern industrial age and confronts its promises and limitations. Knowledge, transportation, production like never before, and yet, racism, gender inequality, poverty, and imperialism.  From this tumultuous period comes the reform efforts of the progressive era, campaigns for equal rights for women, efforts to unionize major industries, and radical movements aimed at undoing capitalism itself.  An array of important US writers work to grapple with a world that, much like the present, feels out of control.  In this course, we’ll concentrate mostly on two literary techniques for doing so, realism and naturalism. Likely writers to be examined will include  Henry James  (Washington Square or The American), EDEN Southworth (The Story of Avis),  Upton Sinclair (The Jungle),  Jack London, Stephen Crane (a selection of short fiction),  William Dean Howells (A Hazard of New Fortunes), Frances Harper (Iola Leroy); and Theodore Dreiser (Sister Carrie). Students should expect to write one short paper and a longer final paper involving some criticism or historical research. 

    d1 approved 2014-2015

    ENGL 363: American Fiction 1950-Present*
    Doody

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    363MWF2-2:50

    SPRING 2015
    ENGL 363 American Fiction 1950-Present
    MWF 2-2:50
    INSTRUCTOR: Doody

    Postmodernism usually suggests a kind of “unconventional” fiction that alludes to the classical experiments of Joyce and Woolf, Proust and Kafka. In the American fiction of the past forty or fifty years, however, one of its most salient features has been its concerns with the political issues of race, gender, war, immigration, and the “problem” of community. We’ll begin with the Nobel Prize winners Saul Bellow and Toni Morrison, and read Mr Sammler’s Planet and Jazz. Then Edward P. Jones’s The Known World and Colum McCann’s Let the Great World Spin, Philip Roth’s The Human Stain and Chimimanda Adichie’s Americanah. are some of the novelists and novels we will read. And wee may then even tackle Gravity’s Rainbow.

    ENGL 364: American Poetry from 1900-1960
    Morris

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    364TR10:50-12:05 Morris
    A survey of representative American poets of the period. These may include Gertrude Stein, Amy Lowell, Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, William Carlos Williams, Ezra Pound, Marianne Moore, T.S. Eliot.

    ENGL 366: American Literature: Bizarre, Strange, and Uncanny
    Gniadek

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    366MWF1-1:50 Gniadek

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 366:  The Bizarre, Strange, and Uncanny in Nineteenth-Century American Literature
    Instructor: Melissa Gniadek
    MWF 1:00-1:50

    Nineteenth-century American Literature can be very unsettling. In this course we will read texts that feature unreliable voices, odd events, and gothic settings, from sleepwalkers and ventriloquists to haunted houses and voices from the “beyond.” We will think about how these texts grapple with a range of historical concerns, including settler violence, questions of nationalism, and the legacies of the Civil War. We will also think about how the texts we read uphold or challenge the boundaries of familiar genres.

    Primary texts may include works by Charles Brockden Brown, Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, Harriet Jacobs, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Harriet Prescott Spofford, Emily Dickinson, Charles Chesnutt, and Mark Twain. Critical readings will help us to situate these texts within conversations about the gothic, about canonical and popular or pulp fiction, and about gender, race, and imperialism in nineteenth-century contexts.

    This course will fulfill the English major pre-1900 requirement!

    ENGL 374: Theories of Cinema: Cinema Studies
    Roof

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    374TR2:30-3:50 Roof

    In this course we will study theory of the cinema: what constitutes cinema and distinguishes it from other arts, the cinematic apparatus, issues of auteurism, genre, and aesthetics, and questions of spectatorship. We will deploy both texts of theory and films, including some of the work of Dziga Vertov, Renoir, Eisenstein, Welles, Hitchcock, Deren, Godard, the Coen Brothers, Brakhage, and others.

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 374
    Cinema Studies: Hollywood Cinema
    Instructor: Roof, Judith 

    This course explores the history, aesthetics, production techniques, and selected films of Hollywood Era films from the 1920s to the 1980s. Course will include papers analyzing specific films as well as papers covering the broader field.  

    ENGL 375: Film and Literature
    Snow

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    375TR1-2:20HRG 224 Snow

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 375 FILM AND LITERATURE
    TTH 1-2:20
    Dr. Snow     email: edsnow@rice.edu

    Despite the title of this course, it is conceived unapologetically as a course in film.  The goal is to saturate ourselves with the absolute best that film has been capable of since 1930 (we won't attempt silent cinema), in order to acquire both an intuitive feeling for and an empirical understanding of what makes a great film great.  All the films we'll view are "best" films and immediately, often wrenchingly, accessible as such. The syllabus, then, is basically a "top 10" list, even though many of its films are not likely to be found on such lists. Its choices are necessarily subject to revision: in the last paper I'll ask you to tell me which of the films you think belong here (as well as any obvious films you think are missing).

    P.S.: We will read literature, when the occasion presents itself--e.g., when a film is based on a book or a play, or when a shooting script is available, we will read all or at least part the source material.  And we'll be reading around constantly in the literature of film.

    Course Work, Grading:

    A key premise of this course is that any really good film has to be viewed twice (at least!) in order to see what's special about it.  Thus we'll meet on Tuesdays to discuss our initial reactions, then view/study the film again in the wake of this discussion for our Thursday meeting.  Each Tuesday there will be a writing prompt keyed to the Thursday discussion and due at the beginning of the Thursday class.  No late papers will be accepted, since their purpose will have expired once Thursday's class is over.  In addition there will be two longer papers (6-10 pages), one due after Spring Break, the other at the end of the semester.  There will be no final or midterm.  Attendance is mandatory.

    The final grade will break down like this:
    Weekly writing prompts: 40%
    Two longer papers: 40%
    Discretionary: 20% (attendance, effort, participation, improvement, etc)
    More than 4 missed classes will result in an F for the discretionary 20%.

    ENGL 386: Medical Media Arts Lab*
    Ostherr

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    386TR 2:30-3:50BRC Ostherr

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 386/FILM 382
    Medical Media Arts Lab
    Prof. Kirsten Ostherr                
    Tues/Thursday 2:30-3:50 

    Medical Media Arts Lab is a new hands-on critical thinking and design class for students with arts, media, writing, design & programming interests or skills who would like to apply and refine their abilities by tackling real-world problems with physicians & patients in the Texas Medical Center who want help visualizing information for health communication.

    Working in teams in collaboration with health & design mentors, students will develop projects that may include short videos, infographics, app development, 3-D virtual models, creative writing, and other media arts.

    This class is a unique opportunity for students interested in medical humanities, health professions & health media, but no pre-med or design background is required. The faculty team will include visual artist Allison Hunter, engineer-designer Matthew Wettergreen, communication expert Tracy Volz. Community mentors will include hackers, designers, & clinicians from Baylor College of Medicine, UT Health, MD Anderson, Texas Children’s Hospital, and the Veterans Administration.

    More info: kostherr@rice.edu 

    ENGL 396 Short Fiction (NEW TOPIC!)
    Lamos

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    396 MWF11-11:50 Lamos

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 396 Literary Genres: SHORT FICTION  
    Instructor: PROF. LAMOS

    We will read short stories by a wide range of writers, from Achebe to Woolf, focusing upon literary analysis.  The brevity of these texts allows us to examine more closely the building blocks of narrative and methods of interpretation.  You will write a weekly blog and three short essays.  Two required texts: Understanding Fiction, ed. Roof, and The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative.  The course is open to all majors.

     

    ENGL 401: Advanced Fiction Writing
    Dermont

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    401Wednesdays2-5:00 Dermont

    A course conducted mostly as a workshop. It will also include some assigned writing exercises and weekly reading of published short stories to deepen students' understanding of narrative technique. Additional time will be spent on special film viewings, reviews, and critiques and readings as directed.

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 401 Advanced Fiction Workshop
    Wednesdays 2-5:00
    Professor Amber Dermont

    We are going to do something very dangerous in this class: we’re going to workshop and revise our short stories. Each student will be responsible for drafting and revising two original fully sustained narratives for our class to consider and discuss. We’re going to strive to make these characters, settings, and plots so credible and engaging that we and others would prefer to spend our time exploring them than do just about anything else in the world. The great American short story writer Flannery O’Connor who grew up poorin Milledgeville, Georgia and spent most of her life dying from lupus and tending to the ornery peacocks she kept as watchdogs, once said about her own writing, “my subject in fiction is the action of grace in a territory held largely by the devil.” In writing our own stories, we will negotiate this space between beauty and mischief as we set about to discover new approaches for composition and revision.

    ENGL 404: Advanced Poetry Writing
    Otremba

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    404Monday3-6:00 Otremba

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 404  Advanced Poetry Writing
    Monday 3-6:00
    Instructor: Otremba, Paul

    This advanced poetry workshop is intended to give those with experience writing poems an opportunity to develop their own writing further and to strengthen their understanding of poetic craft. We will accomplish this by closely reading and discussing student poems. Additionally, we will read collections of poems, both recent and from the tradition, such as Brenda Hillman’s Seasonal Works with Letters on Fire and Larry Levis’s Elegy, as well as craft essays. The class will involve poem exercises, short critical assignments, conventional workshops, and individual meetings, and the goal will be for you to complete a portfolio of new poems that demonstrates your own contribution to contemporary poetry.

     

    (CAPSTONE) ENGL 419: Shakespeare on Stage and Page
    Snow

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    419Wednesdays2:00-5:00 Snow

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 419
    Wed. 2-5:00
    Instructor: Dr. Snow  email: edsnow@rice.edu
    Office Hours: T 10:30-12:00 and by apt. (HRG 333)

                              SHAKESPEARE ON STAGE AND PAGE

    Reading List:  Shakespeare, Othello (Arden edition)

                                    “            King Lear (Arden edition)

                                    “            Antony & Cleopatra (Arden edition)

                            Berger, Harry, Imaginary Audition

    Course Description:

    This course will engage the argument between stage-oriented and text-oriented approaches to Shakepeare as a way of arriving at his plays as the ultimate reading experience—“reading,” in this case, involving (as it always should?) an almost obsessive attention to details.  We’ll read three plays very closely, treating textual ambiguities no differently from the choices that actors, directors, set designers, costumers all make continually when they prepare (as readers!) Shakespeare for the stage.  Student will be expected to turn in a 20-25 page paper at the end of the semester (as per the capstone requirement).  There will also be several weekly writing assignments, but no final or midterm.

    Satisfies the English Major Capstone Requirement 

    (CAPSTONE) ENGL 430: Empire & British Literature 1700-1950
    Joseph

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    430Tuesdays2;30-5:30 Joseph
    Spring 2015
    ENGL 430: Empire and British Literature, 1700-1950
    Tuesdays 2:30-5:30
    Instructor: Prof. Betty Joseph
     
    This course explores the narrative connections, historical coincidences and theoretical implications of different forms of writing and communication associated with the so-called age of Discovery and the age of Empire. We will use some classic fictional works to frame various constellations of readings for the course. The following list constitutes the main topics under investigation in the course. The course will meet weekly in a 3-hour session. Each session will involve student presentations, discussions and in-class writing.
      
    Evaluation: A series of short assignments and papers (bibliography, critical review, close readings) will drive individual student projects towards a final research project comprising a 20-page seminar paper.
      
    Oceans and Voyages
    Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe (1719)
    Related genres: Spiritual Autobiography, Travel Narratives, Ships’ Logs, Company Records, Maps, Captivity Tales, Slave Narratives.
    Topics: visual culture, knowledge and power, space and time, colonialism.
     
    The Romance of Empire
    Sydney Owenson, The Missionary (1811)
    Related genres: Oriental Tales, Missionary tracts, Romantic poetry,
    Topics: Orientalism, Romanticism, Ireland, religious discourse, cultural difference, social reform , cultural conversion, civilization/barbarism
     
    Women, Domesticity and Empire
    Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre (1847)
    Related genres: autobiography, memoirs, marriage contracts, cookbooks, portraits.
    Topics: female individualism, politics of settlement, woman as civilizer, European versus “other” women, zenana literature, feminine picturesque.
     
    Disillusionment and Resistance to Empire
    Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness (1899)
    Topics: Anthropology, Primitivism and the Modern, Africanist discourse
     
    Imperial Melancholia
    E.M. Forster, Passage to India (1924)
    Topics: Modernism, Modernity and Nationalism.
     
    Post-Imperial Britain
    Hanif Kureishi, The Buddha of Suburbia (1990); Sammy and Rose Get Laid (1987)
    Topics: immigration, multiculturalism, postcolonialism.

    Satisfies the English Major Capstone Requirement 

    (CAPSTONE) ENGL 466: Morrison & Faulkner
    Waligora-Davis

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    466TR10:50-12:05 Waligora-Davis

    Spring 2015
    ENGL 466:  Capstone Seminar
    Faulkner and Morrison Seminar
    Instructor: N. Waligora-Davis 

    GA Description: 

    This seminar places in conversation the writings of William Faulkner and Toni Morrison on race, gender, history, and American legal culture. We examine the implications of race and gender on poverty, homelessness, colonialism, segregation, aesthetics, citizenship and due process. 

    Course Description for Spring 2015: 

    This seminar places in conversation the writings of William Faulkner and Toni Morrison on race, gender, history, and American legal culture. From Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom and Go Down Moses to Morrison’s The Bluest Eye and “The Fisherwoman” our work will carry us from the Haitian Revolution to the American Civil War, from WWI to the early Civil Rights movement, from Dred Scott and Plessy v. Ferguson to Brown v. Board of Education and Virginia vs. Loving, from doll studies and miscegenation to lynching and kangaroo justice. We will track the implications of race and gender on poverty, homelessness, colonialism, segregation, aesthetics, and citizenship and due process. Our readings will include but not be limited to Light in August, As I Lay Dying, Absalom, Absalom!, Intruder in the Dust; Go Down Moses, Sula, Jazz; The Bluest Eye, A Mercy, Home; in addition to related critical theory, contemporary film, photography, and music. Writing and research intensive, this course culminates with a required 15-20 page critical research project.  

    Satisfies the English Major Capstone Requirement 

    ENGL 471: Chicana/o Literature
    Aranda

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    471MWF10-10:50 Aranda
    A variable topics course designed to build on student knowledge of chicano/a literature and culture gained earlier in the curriculum. Past topics have included the Chicano/a novel, and Transitions and Translations Chicano/a Autobiography. A continuation of ENGL 371.

    ENGL 493: Independent Study
    ENGLISH FACULTY

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    493as directedas directedTBD as agreed by student & professor

    A variable-credit course designed for students who want to pursue intensive semester-long study of a particular topic not included in the curriculum. Students must identify and receive the approval of an English department faculty member. Instructor and Department approval must be granted prior to registration.


    Instructor permission required.
    Special registration forms available in the English Department.

    ENGL 495: Senior Thesis
    ENGLISH FACULTY

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    495as directedas directedTBD as agreed by student & professor

    Writing and completion of a substantive research project under the supervision of a member of the English department. Prior approval of instructor and department approval must be granted prior to registration. Consult English department website for procedures and application. Instructor and department approval must be granted prior to registration. Prerequisites: ENGL 200; ENGL 300; ENGL 493 or 494.

    Instructor permission required. Applications were due April 14, 2014.

    Senior Thesis Presentations will take place on Friday, April 24, 2015 4-6 pm on Rice campus. Details forthcoming.

    ENGL 498: Queer Theory, Animals
    Lamos

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    498Mondays2-5:00 Lamos

    An examination of key issues in queer theory that links those issues to other major literary and cultural theories of the past quarter century. As such the course will also serve as an introduction to psychoanalytic theory, postculturalism, deconstruction, postcolonial theory, film studies and recent work on the relationship between science and literature. Cross-list: SWGS 430.

    Spring 2015 
    ENGL 498 QUEER THEORY: ANIMALS    (New Topic!)
    Instructor: PROF. LAMOS 
    Mondays 2-5:00

    Queer theory’s critique of human sexual difference extends to the issue of species difference—that between humans and “animals.”  How are sexual differences (male/female and heterosexual/homosexual) wrapped up in the human-nonhuman divide?  What are the consequences of understanding them together?

    Our course explores these questions, first, by studying poststructuralist and postmodern ideas of human subjectivity in the works of Nietzsche, Foucault, and Deleuze and Guattari.  We will then home in on queer theory by reading Sedgwick and Butler, exploring its ramifications for literary study as well as other disciplines, including affect theory (Gandhi).  Finally, we will turn to zoology—reading Bagemihl’s survey of “gay” birds, bees, and giraffes, among others—and to critical animal studies (Haraway, Agamben, Derrida) in order to debate how we may “queer the zoo” or “zoo the queer.”

    You will be asked to keep a weekly blog and to write three short papers.

    This course will fulfill the non-canonical requirement for the English Major

    Fall 2014 (approved for d1 *)

    ENGL 175: Global Literatures in English* (NEW SECTION ADDED!)
    Woods, Chappell, Boyd, Kozicki

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    175.1MWF9-9:50 Woods
    175.2MWF10-10:50 Chappell
    175.4MWF1-1:50 Kozicki
    175.5 New Section!TTH9:25-10:40 Boyd
    Click here for a general description of ENGL 175 for all sections

    ENGL 200: Critical Reading and Writing
    Joseph, Snow, Huston

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    200.1TTH1-2:20 Joseph
    200.2TTH9:25-10:40 Snow
    200.3MWF10-10:50 Huston
    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 200.1 

    ENGL 201: Intro to Creative Writing
    Schimmel

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    201Monday & Wed.4-5:30 Schimmel
    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 201.1

    ENGL 204: Forms of Poetry
    Otremba

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    204TTH4-5:15 Otremba

    ENGL 210: Major British Writers: Chaucer - 1800*
    Nelson

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    210MWF9-9:50 Nelson
    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 210

    ENGL 211: Major British Writers: 1800 - present*
    Browning

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    211MWF11-11:50 Browning
    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 211

    ENGL 250: Masterworks of Fiction*
    Derrick

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    250MWF1-1:50 Derrick
    Click here for a detailed description of this course.

    ENGL 260: Intro to the Study of American Literature*
    Aranda, Rosenthall

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    260.1MWF11-11:50 Aranda
    260.2TTH9:25-10:40 Rosenthal

    Click here for a detailed description of ENGL 260.1

    Click here for a detailed description of ENGL 260.2

    ENGL 269/ENST 265: Green Worlds: Sci Fi and the Environment
    Schneider-Mayerson, Matthew

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 269/ENST265Tuesdays4-4:59 Schneider-Mayerson, Matthew
    GREEN WORLDS: SCIENCE FICTION AND THE ENVIRONMENT (1 credit hour)
    Examines the ways that science fiction has expressed and challenged ideas about nature, culture, society and politics and imagined alternative 'green' worlds. Will focus on authors such as Margaret Atwood, Octavia Butler and Paolo Bacigalupi: films such as "Wall-E" and "Avatar": and accessible secondary criticism.
     
    This class will meet on Tuesdays 4-4:59

    ENGL 270: Aspects of Modern Literature*
    Morris

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    270TTH10:50-12:05 Morris
    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 270

    ENGL 273:Medicine & Media*
    Ostherr

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    273TTH + Wed.10:50-12:05+W 7-9:30 as needed Ostherr
    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 273.

    ENGL 290: Love and Liberty (NEW COURSE!)
    Lurie

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    290TTH2:30-3:45 Lurie
    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 290

    ENGL 301: Introduction to Writing Fiction
    Schimmel, Dermont

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    301.1Tuesday6-9:00 pmWSC 146 Schimmel
    301.2Wed.2-5:00 Dermont
    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 301

    ENGL 304: Introduction to Poetry Writing
    Otremba

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    ENGL 304Wed.2-5:00 Otremba
    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 304

    ENGL 321: Early Shakespeare*
    Mulligan (Replacement for Skura on 8/15/14.)

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    321TTH9:25-10:40HUMA 118 Mulligan

    ENGL 338: Study of British Romanticism*
    Mulligan

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    338MWF11-11:50 Mulligan, John
    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 338

    ENGL 341: Victorian Literature & Culture*
    Logan

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    341TTH1-2:20 Logan
    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 341

    ENGL 346: 20th Century Brit. Literature* (canceled 8/26/14)
    Lamos

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    346 (canceled 8/26/14)MWF1-1:50 Lamos
    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 346

    ENGL 353: Modern Drama on Film and in Performance
    Huston

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    353MWF2-4:00 Huston

    ENGL 354: Queer Literary Cultures
    Lamos

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    354TTH1-2:20 Lamos
    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 354

    ENGL 361: American Literature: 1860-1910*
    Gniadek

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    361TTH9:25-10:40 Gniadek

    ENGL 362: American Literature: 1910-1950*
    Derrick

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    362MWF10-10:50 Derrick
    Click here for a detailed description of this course.

    ENGL 365: Contemporary American Poetry*
    Doody

    ENGL 366 American Literature: Sea Stories (NEW COURSE!)
    Gniadek

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    366TTH2:30-3:45 Gniadek
    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 366

    ENGL 371: Chicana/o Literature*
    Ellis

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    371TTH6:30-7:45 Ellis, A.
    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 371

    ENGL 374: Theories of Cinema (NEW COURSE!)
    Roof

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    374TTH2:30-3:45
    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 374

    ENGL 377: Art & Literature
    Snow

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    377TTH1-2:20 Snow
    Click here for a detailed description of this course.

    ENGL 380: The Empire Writes Back* (NEW COURSE!)
    Joseph

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    380TTH10:50-12:05 Joseph

    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 380

    ENGL 380 effective Fall 2014-Spring 2015 is approved for d1 credit.

    ENGL 380 fulfills the department's non-canonical requirement

    ENGL 381: Women Writers: Contemporary British
    Lamos

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    381MWF2-2:50 Lamos
    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 381

    ENGL 397: Asian American Literature
    Comer

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    397TTH4-5:15 Comer
    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 397

    ENGL 399: Reading the Black Imaginary: 1775-present
    Waligora-Davis

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    399TTH 2:30-3:45 Waligora-Davis
    Click here for detailed description of ENGL 399

    ENGL 400 Special Seminar: The Idea of Nature in the Renaissance
    HRC Visiting Scholar Erica Fudge (Fall 2014)

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    400 (late-add capstone!)Tuesdays6:30-9:30 Fudge, Erica

    Click here for a detailed description of ENGL: 400.

    ENGL 401: Advanced Fiction Writing
    Dermont

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    401Tuesday2:30-5:30 Dermont

    ENGL 441 (capstone):Victorian Studies: Pre-Raphelite Art & Writing
    Logan

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    441 (capstone)Monday3-6:00 Logan

    ENGL 466 (capstone): Studies in American Literature
    Morris

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    466 (capstone)TTH2:30-5:30 Morris
    Click here for a detailed description of ENGL 466

    ENGL 493: Directed Reading

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    493tbdtbd Faculty
    Special forms available in the English department

    ENGL 494: Senior Thesis Preparation

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    494tbdtbd tbd

    Applications are due April 14, 2014 (available in ENGL Dept., Herring Hall 2nd Floor, Room 225)

     

     

    ENGL 495: Senior Thesis Completion

    NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
    tbdtbd tbd
    Not available in Fall semester generally. Fall semester is used for research and preparation. Senior thesis completion takes place in Spring semester.